NOTICIAS

Should Chiapas Farmers Suffer for California’s Carbon?

A California proposal would offset the state’s climate-altering emissions by paying for forest conservation in Chiapas. Could there be unintended consequences in a region with a history of human rights abuse and land grabs?
“We are not responsible for climate change—it’s the big industries that are,” said Abelardo, a young man from the Tseltal Mayan village of Amador Hernández in the Lacandon jungle of Chiapas. “So why should we be held responsible, and even punished for it?”
Painting photo by Jeff ConantAbelardo was one of dozens of villagers who had traveled to the city of San Cristóbal de las Casas to protest an international policy meeting on climate change and forest conservation. At a high-end conference center, representatives from the state of California and from states and provinces around the world were working out mechanisms intended to mitigate climate change by protecting tropical forests. The group was called the Governor’s Climate and Forests Task Force (GCF), and California’s interest was in using forest preservation in Chiapas as a carbon offset—a means for meeting climate change goals under the state’s 2006 Global Warming Solutions Act.
Such an agreement among subnational governments is unprecedented, and California officials view it as an important way for the world’s eighth largest economy to help the developing world. But judging from the reaction on the streets of San Cristóbal, Mexican peasants see it differently. The lush, mountainous state of Chiapas has a long history of human rights abuses, and the Mexican government has forcibly evicted indigenous families from their lands in the name of environmental protection. To indigenous peasants in the Lacandon jungle, the pending agreement has all the hallmarks of a land grab.
And such culture clashes over land and forests may become more common: As scientists, economists, and governments worldwide struggle to find solutions to runaway climate change, they are investing in one-size-fits-all financial strategies for emissions reductions in developing countries. These policies tend to ignore local needs, land tenure issues, small-scale economies, cultural practices, and histories. Communities in developing countries are raising concerns that, in some instances, these alleged cures may be worse than the disease.
The GCF was founded in 2009 when 16 states and provinces, from California to Central Kalimantan, Indonesia, and from Cross-River State, Nigeria, to Acre, Brazil, decided to explore ways to implement a program called Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD). REDD is a program intended to fight climate change by stopping deforestation. Under REDD, the industrialized North hopes to offset carbon emissions by paying the global South to preserve forests (which store carbon). Since its acceptance into U.N. climate negotiations in 2005, the program has grown popular among international agencies and governments interested in funding rural development—and has generated fierce resistance among sectors of the rural poor and indigenous peoples.
When indigenous peasant farmers in Chiapas hear that they’ll be paid to stop growing traditional crops and reforest with African palm trees, they see signs of a familiar pattern. And when they’re told that they may have to leave their jungle villages to allow the forest to recover, they’re acutely aware of the ongoing theft of their lands. In Chiapas, both projects—the planting of biofuel crops and the forced resettlement of forest communities—are linked to the local implementation of REDD.
To indigenous peasants in the Lacandon jungle, the pending agreement has all the hallmarks of a land grab.
Agencies and policy leaders acknowledge the tension, but are sometimes dismissive of the depth of the problem. William Boyd, senior advisor to the GCF and a professor of law at the University of Colorado, said, “Any broad public policy is going to generate opposition. We understand that, and we see the need to do a better job at communicating our objectives.”
But the problem is not merely communication. It is an issue of fundamentally different ways of viewing the world. León Enrique Ávila, an agronomist and professor of sustainable development at the Intercultural University of Chiapas, sees REDD as “a continuation of the colonial project to do away with the indigenous worldview.”
Ávila’s work is strongly rooted in the indigenous concept of lekil kuxlejal, or el buen vivir—a complex worldview involving harmony among people, the environment, and the ancestors. According to this way of thinking, people are a part of—not apart from—nature. From this perspective, even apparently benign Western notions of wealth, development, conservation, and sustainability are as alien and as hostile as the more recognized ills of consumerism, individualism, and war.
“REDD and projects of this type,” Ávila said, ignore “that nature [has its own] rights, and treat it as a provider of goods and services, a purely economic entity. This perspective is fundamentally hostile to lekil kuxlejal.”

A closely watched partnership

Of numerous REDD projects worldwide, the agreement between California and Chiapas, expected to come online by 2015, is the most advanced, and was the subject of great interest at the Chiapas GCF meeting. “We are all watching the California-Chiapas project closely,” said Iwan Wibisono of the Indonesian National REDD+ Task Force.
In 2006, California passed the Global Warming Solutions Act, which mandates that the state reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by the year 2020. Under the act’s implementation plan, approved by the California Air Resources Board in 2011, 15 to 20 percent of the state’s mandated emission reductions will come from a cap-and-trade program that regulates the state’s major industrial polluters. The program allows polluters to meet part of their emissions-reduction targets by purchasing carbon credits. Also known as offsets, these let a company pay someone else to reduce CO2 emissions instead of reducing pollution at the source. Currently, the state only allows offsets in the United States. But if the REDD plan goes through, California companies could pay states in some of the world’s most forested regions not to cut down their trees.
As one of his last acts in office, former California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger signed a memorandum of understanding with Chiapas, opening the door for California industries to buy offsets generated there. (Other states working on similar agreements with California include Acre, Brazil, Aceh, Indonesia, and Cross-River State, Nigeria).
Two years later, the protocols for this agreement are still in development by a non-governmental body called the REDD Offsets Working Group, which is expected to release its recommendations before the end of 2012.

Echoes of history

In preparing for the GCF meeting in San Cristóbal, a number of Chiapas-based civil society groups formed a coalition called REDDeldía (the English translation would be “REDD-ellion,” as in “rebellion”), which held a parallel forum denouncing the GCF and REDD. The group’s statement, issued in advance of the GCF meeting, called REDD “the new face, painted green by the climate crisis, of an old and familiar form of colonialism that advances the appropriation of lands and territories through dispossession and forced displacement.” That sentiment was echoed by a similar forum convened in San Cristóbal the same week by La Vía Campesina, the world’s largest federation of peasant farmers.
REDD Protester photo by Jeff Conant
A woman from the highlands of Chiapas holds a “No REDD” poster outside the Governors Climate and Forests Task Force meeting.
Photo by Jeff Conant.
For groups in Chiapas, these concerns are rooted in recent local history. In 1971, the Mexican government issued a decree that gave about 1.5 million acres of the Lacandon jungle to the Lacandon Maya—one of several ethnic groups that call the region their home—while retaining the rights to exploit timber, minerals, and other resources. A second decree in 1976 made the greater part of the jungle—the area with the richest biodiversity in Mexico—into a UNESCO World Heritage site called the Montes Azules Biosphere Reserve.
Along with a few settlements from the Tseltal and Ch’ol ethnic groups, who negotiated their way into the agreement, the nominal owners of this territory were designated “the Lacandon Community.” But the creation of the Lacandon Community came with a political cost: in order to give the Lacandon Maya 1.5 million acres of forest, 26 villages of Tseltal and Ch’ol people—over 2,000 families who had lived there for decades, if not centuries—had to be moved.
After their expulsion, several peasant farmer organizations demanded redress, and the resulting tension between the Lacandon Community and its neighbors made it impossible, for decades, for the Mexican government to successfully demarcate the territory. The demarcation line became known as la brecha Lacandona—“brecha” meaning split, schism, or gap. Some of the expelled communities later coalesced to form the Zapatista Army of National Liberation, the indigenous rebel group that brought Chiapas to the world’s attention with their 1994 uprising. Among the proto-Zapatistas and the other peasant farmer groups in the region in the 1970s, one of the primary political slogans was “No to la brecha Lacandona!”
With REDD, work is underway again to draw la brecha Lacandona. In February, 2011, Chiapas Governor Juan Sabines began distributing payments of 2,000 pesos a month to members of the Lacandon Community as part of the state’s Climate Change Action Program, and the state began expelling “illegal settlers” from the Montes Azules Reserve.
“The jungle was previously occupied by over 900 communities,” Sabines told the GCF at the opening plenary. “Now we have cleared them from the jungle. Today the Reserves are being conserved and protected by their legitimate owners, who will soon have access to the carbon markets.”
Among the communities slated for removal from the jungle is the village of Amador Hernández—1,500 Tseltal Mayan subsistence farmers who escaped plantation servitude in the 1950s to make their homes in bare wooden huts and cultivated scattered cornfields in the area that is now the Montes Azules Reserve. On the first day of the three-day GCF meeting, several campesinos from Amador Hernández and neighboring communities entered the auditorium and requested a few minutes at the microphone. Chiapas State Minister of the Environment and Natural History Fernando Rosas denied their request, telling the community members that they should listen first to the meeting’s proceedings. If they wanted to consider joining the REDD program, the minister told them, he would meet with them at a later date.
Unsatisfied, the campesinos mounted a protest. They handed out flyers declaring, “The government is lying to you—they have neither informed us nor consulted us!” Eufemia Landa Sanchez, a woman from a deforested region on the edge of the Montes Azules Reserve, then took the microphone and read a message to the plenary.
“Transnational businesses have had plans for the rural areas of Chiapas for some time now,” Sanchez said. “The natural wealth of biodiversity and water, of mines, of biofuels, and of course of petroleum, have led to the displacement of people, the poisoning of the earth, and have made the peasant farmer into a serf on his own land. And in every case they blame us and criminalize us. Our supposed crime today is that we are responsible for global warming.
“Why do the wealthy want to impose their will by force?” she continued. “The jungles are sacred, and they exist to serve the people, as God gave them to us. We do not go to your countries and tell you what to do with your lives and your lands. We ask that you respect our lives and our lands, and go back where you came from!”

Hanging in the balance

Insiders in the GCF projected that, given the complexities of linking an emerging market in California to forested lands abroad, and the level of controversy in Chiapas, the Chiapas-California plan has no better than a 50/50 chance of coming to fruition. Aside from the 2010 agreement, no formal protocols have been approved by the two states. And, aside from a $1.5 million grant to the GCF from the U.S. State Department and hope that a so-far hypothetical carbon market will provide some stable cash flow, little funding is on the horizon.
“If we can’t build a $6 million fund to make this happen, then we’ve got to think about other options,” said Boyd. “Among these options, we’re looking at innovative models for leveraging private sector investment.”

After enduring years of toxic dumping and rising cancer rates, indigenous Ecuadorians took oil giant Chevron to court to fight for the life of the rainforest—and its people.
Three weeks after the Chiapas GCF meeting, the California Air Resources Board (ARB) received a visit at its Sacramento office from a group of environmental justice advocates with ties to the Global South—including an anthropologist who works closely with Amador Hernández, an indigenous leader from Brazil, and representatives of Friends of the Earth U.S. They drew a picture of land grabs, government repression, and related abuses, and urged state officials to drop all consideration of international forest offsets in California climate policy.
Edie Chang, assistant division chief for the ARB, thanked the visitors for raising the issues, and assured them, “We’ve told these governments that we’re far from making a decision.”
Jason Gray, the ARB’s staff counsel, acknowledged the concerns as well: “We really only want to work with jurisdictions that engage in consultation and participatory processes. … We understand the political risks. … We would only want to be involved if California can take a leadership role.”
What that leadership looks like remains to be seen. But if land and culture are threatened by any policy advanced by the GCF, indigenous peasant farmers in Chiapas will not back down without a fight. “These campesinos don’t want a revolution to change they way they live,” explained León Ávila, echoing the words of Mexican revolutionary Emiliano Zapata. “They want a revolution because they want to continue living as they always have.”

Jeff Conant Head ShotJeff Conant wrote this article for What Would Nature Do?, the Spring 2013 issue of YES! Magazine. Jeff is author of A Community Guide to Environmental Health and A Poetics of Resistance: The Revolutionary Public Relations of the Zapatista Insurgency. He writes for Alternet, Earth Island Journal, Upside Down World, and  Z Magazine.


Líderes indígenas que rechazan REDD en California responsabilizan al gobernador por su seguridad

Mientras los legisladores de California se preparan para lanzar el mercado de carbono estatal como parte de su Ley de Cambio Climático, líderes indígenas viajaron a Sacramento para solicitar a las autoridades, no incluir un mecanismo de compensación conocido como REDD en la ley.

REDD quiere decir "Reducción de Emisiones por Deforestación y Degradación de Bosques" y es un mecanismo de mercado controvertido que propone proteger bosques tropicales con el fin de capturar y almacenar dióxido de carbono. Pero los proyectos de tipo REDD han dado lugar a graves violaciónes de los derechos humanos, y muchos líderes indígenas han denunciado los proyectos REDD como una falsa solución al cambio climático, según la delegación.

Los miembros de la Alianza Mundial de los Pueblos Indígenas y Comunidades Locales sobre Cambio Climático, contra REDD y por la Vida viajaron desde México, Brasil y Ecuador a Sacramento la semana pasada para declarar ante las autoridades

Californianas y reunirse con funcionarios de la oficina del gobernador Jerry Brown y la Agencia de Protección del Medio Ambiente estatal. Miembros de la Alianza han sufrido persecución y amenazas por hablar en contra de estos programas, dijeron los portavoces del grupo.

De acuerdo con Tom Goldtooth, director ejecutivo de la Red Ambiental Indígena, "REDD es una estafa perversa que permite a los contaminadores como Chevron seguir destruyendo el medio ambiente. Las Naciones Unidas reconocen que REDD podría resultar en la exclusión de la gente de los bosques, la mayoría de los cuales están en tierras indígenas. REDD es potencialmente genocida."

En 2010, California firmó convenios con los estados de Chiapas en México y Acre en Brasil y otros estados que pueden vincular la política climática de California a estas regiones tropicales. Los visitantes en Sacramento dijeron a los legisladores que están sufriendo acoso, intimidación y vandalismo en sus hogares y oficinas por rechazar proyectos de tipo REDD.

José Carmelio Alberto Nunes (Ninawá), presidente de la Federación del Pueblo Huni Kui de Acre, Brasil, dice que él y su esposa han recibido llamadas telefónicas anónimas advirtiéndoles: "ten cuidado con lo que dices y con quién hablas, o puedes tener un accidente."

"Creo que mi llegada a California amenaza los intereses que esperan hacer dinero con REDD", dijo el líder Huni Kui. "El que habla en contra de REDD en Acre es perseguido."

A medida que la política se mueve hacia adelante, Ninawá dice que no tiene miedo de hablar. "Si soy asesinado por resistirme a REDD y defender mi tierra, otros Ninawás continuarán la lucha".

A pesar de las "salvaguardas" voluntarias, proyectos de tipo REDD ya están resultando en muertes, desalojos violentos, reubicaciones forzadas, encarcelamientos, guardias armados y prohibiciones de acceso y uso de la tierra esencial para la supervivencia de los pueblos indígenas y comunidades dependientes de los bosques.

Rosario Aguilar, promotora de salud de Chiapas, México, y miembro de la delegación a California, dijo: "Incluso antes de que California ha establecido su mercado, el proyecto tipo REDD que se está implementado en las comunidades está causando conflicto y desplazamientos. Como parte de su plan para sacar a las comunidades indígenas de sus tierras, el gobierno cortó los servicios médicos a la población de Amador Hernández en la Selva Lacandona. Por eso decimos que REDD está promoviendo la muerte, no la vida."

El mismo Gobierno del Estado de Chiapas señala en su Programa de Acción de Cambio Climático que 172 comunidades ya han sido "desplazadas", como parte de sus esfuerzos para evitar la deforestación.

"Teniendo en cuenta los acuerdos de REDD de California, responsabilizamos al Estado de California y al gobernador Jerry Brown de la seguridad física y moral de los que hablan en contra de REDD", dijo Goldtooth.

Michelle Chan, directora de Política Económica para los Amigos de la Tierra, informó que en la reunión de la delegación con Cliff Rechtschaffen, asesor de Brown sobre el cambio climático, "Amigos de la Tierra pidió expresamente que si alguno de los participantes sufriera acoso o amenazas al regresar a casa como resultado de la reunión con la oficina del gobernador, que el gobernador haga lo que pueda para ayudar a remediar la situación."

Rechtschaffen respondió que la oficina del gobernador tomaría las medidas apropiadas.

Del Consejo de Recursos del Aire de California se espera una decisión en 2013 sobre si se buscará o no incluir los créditos REDD en el mercado de carbono en California.

Marlon Santi, dirigente K'ichwa de la comunidad Sarayaku en Ecuador, famoso por resistirse a la explotación petrolera y hablar en contra de REDD, dijo que los pueblos indígenas no sólo responsabilizan a la oficina del gobernador. "Estamos llevando nuestro caso a las Naciones Unidas. Tenemos que lograr que REDD deje de amenazar la sobrevivencia de nuestros pueblos."





 


California’s Global Warming Trading Scheme Could Endanger Indigenous Forest Peoples
International Delegation Warns Against Carbon Offsets Rejected by Other Global Governments

SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 17 – Leaders of indigenous forest peoples warned today that California’s proposed carbon credits trading scheme – intended to help reduce global warming – could in fact threaten the survival of those who live there.

At issue are so-called REDD credits that may be part of the state’s cap-and-trade carbon market. These credits would allow California polluters to meet limits on greenhouse gas emissions by buying carbon offset credits from international initiatives intended to prevent destruction of tropical rainforests.

“In Acre, the demarcation of indigenous territories is paralyzed because they want to take our lands to make profits from environmental services, through programs like REDD,” said José Carmelio Alberto Nunes, known as Ninawá, the President of the Federation of the Huni Kui people of Acre, Brazil. “We will not and cannot trade our hunting, our fishing, and our lives for pollution. You cannot trade pollution for nature. We are for life – therefore we are against REDD.”

Ninawá is among a delegation of indigenous leaders from Mexico, Brazil and Ecuador who are traveling to Sacramento this week to testify before the state Air Resources Board and meet with officials from Gov. Jerry Brown’s office and Cal-EPA.

“We support California’s efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions,” said Tom Goldtooth, Executive Director of the Minnesota-based Indigenous Environmental Network. “But REDD amounts to nothing more than a plan to grab the lands that our indigenous peoples have always cared for, in exchange for permits that let industries continue to pollute.”

“REDD plus indigenous peoples equals genocide,” Goldtooth said.

Although the Air Resources Board has yet to issue a draft rule to accept REDD credits into its carbon trading system, the state has been actively exploring the option through initiatives such as the Governors Forests and Climate Task Force. The task force is an initiative started by California in 2008 to create a supply of REDD credits for California’s carbon market. Under a 2010 agreement, Chiapas, Mexico and Acre, Brazil are the two states that will be the first to potentially supply California with REDD credits.

The Task Force held its annual meeting last month in Chiapas, Mexico, where the meeting was met with public protests.
 
Rosario Aguilar, a health promoter from the region and a member of the delegation to California, said, “Even before California has established its market, the REDD+ project being implemented in our communities is causing conflict and displacement.  As part of their plan to move indigenous people off the land, the government cut off medical services to the village of Amador Hernández in the Lacandon Jungle. This is why we say that REDD is promoting death, not life.”
 
Opposition to REDD credits is also building within California. In July, over 30 California groups, including Friends of the Earth, Communities for a Better Environment, the Center for Race, Poverty and the Environment and Greenpeace wrote to Governor Brown, urging him to reject REDD credits from California’s cap and trade system. The groups pointed out that because REDD credits lack environmental integrity and pose unacceptably high social risks, “to date no regulatory carbon market in the world has allowed the use of sub-national forest offsets for compliance.”

“While Chevron explodes in Richmond and causes over 15,000 people to be hospitalized, it’s clear that we need real climate solutions to address greenhouse gases and toxic pollution in California,” said Nile Malloy, Northern California Program Director at Communities for a Better Environment. “REDD is not the solution. We need equitable, renewable and just solutions to solve the climate crisis at home and not negatively impact the Global South and other communities in the process.”

 

 

 The Future of Carbon Trading in Chiapas


Danny Thiemann interviews the Soto-Karlin Brothers
October 15, 2012

Climate change activism collides with indigenous land movements in Mexico’s Zapatista heartland, where the interests of a green economy threaten to crowd out the voices of those for whom it matters.

Courtesy the Soto-Karlins
In late September 2012, brothers and documentary filmmakers Aaron Soto-Karlin and David Soto-Karlin concluded three years of filming the effects of deforestation on indigenous communities in Mexico with footage from the Annual Meeting of the Governors’ Climate and Forest Taskforce (GCF), hosted in Chiapas. Initiated by former California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger, GCF promotes a political program called Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD). REDD aims to reduce the emissions driving climate change by providing financial incentives for developing countries to manage forests and protect biodiversity. In Chiapas, however, GCF is advocating a “forest carbon trading” approach, which would link Chiapas to California’s carbon market, preserving rainforests in Mexico to offset industrial emissions in the U.S. Groups like Greenpeace have criticized the program not only for its potential to exacerbate the climate crisis, but also for the social problems it creates.
Compensation under REDD is tied to land titles—legal owners of property are paid to care for its forests, which gets complicated in areas with unclear tenure rights. For an indigenous community dependent on forests for livelihood, recommended changes in land use patterns can have a devastating effect by binding agricultural practices to volatile market forces. While David saw the conference as an opportunity for community voices to be heard and participatory planning processes to be established, he also realized the disconnect between community-based strategies and policy programs.
Aaron first moved to Chiapas to study bioprospecting as a Fulbright Fellow. An animated anthropologist and networker, he is the founder of the Public Education Partnerships program at Johns Hopkins. David is a documentary filmmaker who has produced video shorts for organizations such as the Clinton Global Initiative and SeeChangeNow.org. A storyteller and spiritual student, he studied with the Vietnamese Buddhist Thich Nhat Hanh in Southern France. Over the phone from Chiapas and in my apartment in Mexico City, the brothers discussed the communities they work with, finding narrative in documentary film, and what’s missing from the climate change conversation.
—Danny Thiemann for Guernica.
Guernica: What brings you to the GCF Annual Meeting?
David Soto-Karlin: This conference is dealing with some of the most pressing issues of the twenty-first century: rural poverty, development, climate change, and irresponsible conservation. I see the conference as a microcosm of a larger problem happening all over the world. People are displaced for the biodiversity on their land, which can be sold in carbon-trading programs like REDD. This is a conflict zone, where the government and environmental organizations have encouraged–or forced–people to be urbanized, to leave their lands in the interest of a “green-economy.” But many believe that more urbanization in a country like Mexico only further stresses the food system and social infrastructure.
While REDD+ can bring benefits to poor farmers it can also stoke the flames of conflict where land ownership boundaries are not clear.
Guernica: Can you elaborate on this relationship between land conflict and the GCF’s focus on REDD and global carbon trading?
Aaron Soto-Karlin: REDD+ is a way to incentivize land owners to make forests worth more standing than they’re worth cleared for timber, grazing, or agriculture. In Chiapas, arguably the heart of the anti-globalization movement, local landowners see outside systems telling them how to use their land as a threat to their autonomy. While REDD+ can bring benefits to poor farmers, it can also stoke the flames of conflict where land ownership boundaries are not clear. After the Cancun Climate talks in 2010, the Governor of Chiapas began paying a small portion of jungle residents a subsidy to protect the jungle from illegal invaders. The Governor classifies the project as REDD+. This has provoked the ire both of local farmers, who want autonomy, and members of the conservation community, who say the project meets few of the REDD+ program’s quality control standards.
Guernica: How are Governor Schwarzenegger and California involved?
Aaron Soto-Karlin: In 2008, Schwarzenegger learned that deforestation accounted for about twenty percent of global emissions driving climate change, and as the Governator, he felt he had to do something about it. Not dissuaded by the fact that he was the governor of California and not a tropical forest state, he traveled to dozens of tropical forest states around the world and convinced their leaders to join him in combating emissions from deforestation. That’s how the GCF was born. In late 2010, the State of California passed a sub-national carbon trading Memorandum of Understanding with the State of Chiapas and another state in Brazil. There has been a lot of controversy and push-back against this move, both in California and Chiapas.
Guernica: How does California’s sub-national carbon trading memorandum with Chiapas allow polluting companies to keep on polluting?
Aaron Soto-Karlin: Essentially, it’s just a fine or a tax. Critics say that forest carbon offsets are a false solution to climate change because they allow polluting companies to keep on polluting by paying this tax. Vulnerable communities in the United States also get upset about forest carbon offsets, because they bear the burden of the petrochemical runoff in California that’s being offset by forests in Chiapas. The international human rights community gets upset because forest peoples can be evicted from ancestral lands. The environmental community finds them troublesome because it’s difficult to verify how much carbon we’re actually taking out of the atmosphere in politically volatile regions.
Guernica: Can you provide some context with regard to land disputes in Chiapas?
Aaron Soto-Karlin: It starts with land ownership. During Mexico’s great Agrarian Reform from 1917 through 1992, people formed ejidos–groups of twenty people that joined together to lay claim to a piece of land. At one point, fifty-five percent of national territory was owned by the “social sector,” or ejidos.
Two events are often cited as sparking and perpetuating conflict in the Lacandon Jungle. In 1972, the Federal Government granted over 2,300 square miles to sixty-six Lacandon Maya families, thereby denying property to some thirty thousand other indigenous people who petitioned for the same land. This giveaway, known as a dotación, transformed the thirty thousand other petitioners into illegal residents overnight, which set the stage for the Zapatista Revolution. The disenfranchised indigenous farmers formed cooperatives and received extensive training from liberation theologists and radical political groups, which provided fertile ground for Subcomandante Marcos and his band of militants to launched the Zapatista movement.
Guernica: What was the second event?
Aaron Soto-Karlin: In 1978, the protected-area-movement hit Mexico and the Federal Government declared 12,000 square miles of that same region a Biosphere Reserve. That doesn’t change who owns the land, but it does change how the land can be used, be it for farming, hunting, grazing, ecological research, or strict conservation. Through the present day, the government has taken a piecemeal approach to resolving the needs of those thirty thousand petitioner-squatters, their children, and their grandchildren. After a series of resettlement, indemnification, clustering, and forced eviction efforts dating back to the late 1970s, ten to twelve illegal communities still remain. Strangely, the greatest threat those communities face now is eviction by environmental groups who believe the land calls for strict “fortress” conservation. The global environment movement, conceived in the developed world, is being forced to deal with extreme rural poverty in the developing world.
Guernica: What is the link between the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) coming into force and the Zapatista guerrillas’ declaration of war against the Mexican government?
Aaron Soto-Karlin: When Mexico signed NAFTA, it was required to change its land tenure laws and agricultural subsidies. Until 1992, farmers could not sell collective ejido land. For NAFTA to go through, the U.S. and Canada insisted that social sector land must be on the market. The Mexican Government didn’t see this as a big deal because farmers were already renting their lands to agribusiness for twenty-five- to one hundred-year periods. The Zapatistas, however, saw NAFTA as part of the unfeeling arm of global commerce that homogenizes cultures and alienates people from human relationships. In some ways, REDD+ is trying to correct for some of these failures by incentivizing a community’s sustainable relationship to its forests.
Guernica: Can you describe the people you’re working with?
Aaron Soto-Karlin: The protagonist in our film is named Nicholas Moshan. He is a fifty-three-year-old Tzotizil Maya Indian born in the highlands, where they practice subsistence agriculture. They produce corn, beans, squash, chili, and some fruit, but there is no agricultural work available, and nothing in labor either. There was a shortage of electricity and potable water. Some time ago, he went to the coast of Chiapas—over 90 miles and through two mountain chains between him and the ocean. He worked as a peon on a giant coffee plantation, which doesn’t seem much different from post-civil war sharecropping. Moshan describes it as a dark, negative time; the foremen and employers would threaten him with guns or whips if he didn’t meet quotas.
Then the federal government sent out this invitation to get people to colonize the Lacandon jungle. Moshan heard it on the radio: land. He ended up in this unclaimed fertile valley, which he calls his Jerusalem, where he lives life on his own terms.
Moshan studied theology in San Cristobal, where he combined religious studies with an education on land tenure. He learned to read and write there in his late thirties and studied liberation theology. He is not married, doesn’t have any children, and is a serious goofball. He has a flair for performance and whenever we film he pretends to be a reporter or a news anchor. He’s also a gifted diplomat. He shapes his story depending on who is listening: his own union, the rural unions, the church, the lawyers. He is a popular politician, but it’s interesting because he becomes much more reserved whenever he ventures into the city. You see him become quieter as he travels from the country into the city.
REDD was designed to reduce emissions… What it was not designed to do is address long standing equity and exclusion issues.
Guernica: Discussing the relationship between cities and forests, Susan Sontag quoted from a turn-of-the-century book called A Berlin Childhood: “Not to find one’s way about in a city is of little interest. But to lose one’s way in a city, as one loses one’s way in a forest, requires practice… I learned this art late in life… the art of straying.” I see a similar fascination in your work that frames how people from cities get lost in forests and vice versa. What is the countryside like where you’ve been living and working in Chiapas?
Aaron Soto-Karlin: Red macaws, pigs, cattle, other tropical birds, dense tropical jungle growing over the walls and roofs. It’s hot enough that nobody does anything from 10:30 a.m through 3:30 p.m.
Guernica: Who else do you work with?
Aaron Soto-Karlin: Juan Aguilar Mendez, who was a refugee from Guatemala’s Civil War in the early ’80s when General Efraín Rios became president and applied a scorched earth policy. Over the past few years, Juan has been helping out a Midwife and Healers’ Union. He is a talented rhetorician and orator who gets a lot of heads nodding about the greatness of Mayan people. He has a vision, a sense of story, a perspective on the conflicts around him.
Guernica: What is the stance of the campesinos you talk to about global carbon trading?
David Soto-Karlin: There is a serious cultural and conceptual divide between remote subsistence farmers and urban bureaucrats negotiating policies. Many campesinos don’t understand the details of the policies that are taking away their land titles.
Aaron Soto-Karlin: The campesinos we work with are hyper-pragmatic. They respond to specific–not abstract–proposals. The question is, can we implement this or not? These communities speak using indigenous Mayan grammar, but Spanish vocabulary. I learned this vernacular, which makes a huge difference in the way people respond to proposals. There is a profound skepticism to outsiders.
As a documentary filmmaker, I think it’s best to start by thinking about artistic vision and the truth of your character. And then you start thinking about artistic vision in the way your character sees the world.
The view on REDD I sense is: somebody is paying me not to touch the trees, which leaves out the complex institutional structures or global perspectives that influence the motivations and restraints on the project. Whether people have a positive or negative view on REDD often falls along ideological lines. Those that work with the government see it as a plus because it’s another subsidy. The Zapatistas see it as a form of imperialism.
Guernica: Were indigenous voices heard in any meaningful way at the GCF Annual Meeting?
Aaron Soto-Karlin: The conference organizers were accommodating of indigenous voices, but the government was not. Indigenous voices were present but the degree to which they impacted the discourse during that week was minimal. REDD is switching its emphasis from emissions reductions that have ancillary benefits of development to an emphasis on development with ancillary benefits of emissions reduction. It’s a colossal task to familiarize environmental specialists with the lessons learned over the past forty years of development efforts. The community members in attendance reminded the specialists that they’re dealing with people, not just policy agenda.
Guernica: Is REDD well-designed?
Aaron Soto-Karlin: REDD was designed to reduce emissions and there are a lot of smart people trying to figure out how to make it do that. What it was not designed to do is address long standing equity and exclusion issues. Those sociopolitical components are add-ons or afterthoughts.
Guernica: As you are wrapping up filming of a three-year documentary, tell me a little bit about how you decide when your story is resolved–when you have to put your lens cap back on.
David Soto-Karlin: The idea is that this will be one of the last core narrative shoots. Events that are driving the narrative direction of the story, especially the macro-conflict our protagonists are confronting, come to a head at this conference.
The conference represents the meeting of two worlds, which are far apart. This is a great opportunity, locally, to see if indigenous voices will be heard. If not, it should provide insight into what is limiting each side from progress. I think it’s a good place to end, because whatever happens, it will be a good place for others to pick up the story. No matter what, combating climate change and deforestation will need to be inclusive and involve local communities.
Guernica: How does this big-picture policy relate to the story and heart of your film?
David Soto-Karlin: There is a coming to terms with urban economies. We follow our protagonist’s attempts to stand up to forces bigger than him and regain title to his land. Ideally, it would symbolize a paradigm shift in terms of a green economy and a fair evaluation of resources. We are at a breaking point of surviving on this planet that will require a shift towards a “green-economy.”
Guernica: With so much time and investment in this documentary, what happens if the story doesn’t pan out how you thought it would?
David Soto-Karlin: We have to end it at some point but it’s hard to do without a sense of resolution in the community we’ve followed. We might have to reframe it to express that this community, and many global indigenous communities, are hanging in the balance. These are local concerns but global problems, and we’re seeing that there won’t be a real solution without local buy in.
Guernica: What would local buy in look like for REDD?
Aaron Soto-Karlin: Identifying who is affected, identifying their interests, and then doing due diligence by going to their homes and answering questions. It would involve using popular education materials to explain what’s going on in a way that works for campesinos.
Guernica: Is there anything you wish you would have learned before starting out?
David Soto-Karlin: To be a documentary filmmaker dealing with global issues like this, you really have to love the issue. A long, investigative project like this is consuming and not lucrative in the short or medium term. I had to create a new understanding of what it meant to be devoted to something. You also must have a strong idea of the story, the dramatic arc, but must be prepared to throw it out if things change. To do it well and make an impact with your story, you need to cast a wide net.
Guernica: How have you seen successful documentaries grab people’s attention?
David Soto-Karlin: I would never tell anyone that our documentary is meant for everyone. Our audience is clearly those already invested in climate change issues. But if the movie is seen by a larger audience, I hope the audience will identify with the story and think they’ve had similar experiences, like having to make a big decision in life, betraying family in the interest of a significant other, or giving up on one dream and living with a smaller one. That is what makes people complex and more appealing than black and white portrayals or caricatures, and that is how you lead an audience through an intense human experience. I think once you can connect with people on that base human level, then they’ll be more receptive and hopefully eager to discuss pragmatic solutions to pressing, real-world problems.
Guernica: The voice you seem to be going for reminds me of Jamaica Kincaid: her stories of growing up in foreign locations were stories kept within a hallway, a bedroom room, or a familiar road down to the sea.
David Soto-Karlin: When we see these worlds close up, we find they’re much less foreign or exotic than our romantic expectations. So we point the camera at mundane issues as they’re changing, like relationships once defined by love turning into a couple who just cares about money, or how a wife starts to call her husband a bum, and so he starts to change his idealistic priorities to her real, pragmatic needs.
Guernica: Did you ever want the camera to lie, or to change your subjects into something they were not?
David Soto-Karlin: Truth in vision is important. As a documentary filmmaker, I think it’s best to start by thinking about artistic vision and the truth of your character. And then you start thinking about artistic vision in the way your character sees the world.
Guernica: Can you give me any examples?
David Soto-Karlin: One character was developing an herbalism and healing practice, so we followed the relationship between him and traditional medicine. As a character, he completely changed during our three years of filming. He was committed to traditional medicine and preserving Mayan identity–giving away his medicine as a form of Mayan solidarity, but ended up buying a computer and running his organization with a real profit motivation. I think before we opened to a very different portrayal, we really wanted to see him as an archetypal, infallible hero. This is where you can have a lot of threads going on in a story at once.

 

 

 Finalmente sale el cobre, se estaban tardando los investigadores del Cinvestav Mérida para echar a andar la "economía verde", proyectos REDD para zonas de manglar en México, que pena que la investigación siga al servicio de las grandes corporaciones....

Manglares pueden ser una fuente de ingreso.- 

Portal Economico
Por Esto - Yucatán, Martes, 25 de Septiembre de 2012

Yucatán, En la Península de Yucatán se ubica el 52 por ciento de los manglares de todo el país, los cuales capturan más carbono que los bosques, por lo que ayudan a contrarrestar el cambio climático, afirmó ayer Jorge Herrera Silveira, investigador del Cinvestav. Agregó que anualmente se pierde entre el 2 y 3 por ciento de los manglares por efectos del cambio climático y la mano del hombre. En el marco de los preparativos del II Congreso nacional de investigación en cambio climático, nuestro entrevistado comentó que los manglares pueden ser una fuente de ingreso y de ayuda al medio ambiente. “En el próximo II Congreso nacional de Investigación en cambio climático participaré con dos temas: el incremento del nivel del mar y las afectaciones en los manglares; cada año el nivel del mar sube 3 milímetros en promedio en la península y hemos visto que esto genera vulnerabilidad en algunos manglares, principalmente los que son talados, contaminados y mucho menos en los que están en un programa de conservación. “Desde hace 15 años estamos trabajando en toda la costa de la península para tener en un plazo de 5 a 10 años un monitoreo de los manglares; tenemos áreas seleccionadas como Celestún, Sisal, Laguna de Términos, Dzilam, Holbox, Mahaual, Telchac, Río Lagartos, Chetumal, Cozumel, para determinar el estatus de cada manglar y con base en ello se pueda planear las granjas pesqueras o desarrollos turísticos”, dijo. Agregó que en este estudio incluyen el proyecto de capturar carbono en los manglares y en 2 años habrá resultados al respecto. “El manglar captura más carbono que el bosque porque la materia orgánica de los manglares lo almacena y los que tienen mayor capacidad de almacenamiento son los conocidos como chaparral; el 70 por ciento de los manglares en Yucatán son chaparral; por ello es tan importante la restauración de los manglares”, apuntó.Agregó que la mayor preocupación es que a pesar de las leyes y de las protecciones a los manglares se sigue talando o rellenando y el ejemplo más cercano es Holbox. “En Holbox quieren hacer un proyecto turístico; es un mega desarrollo que pretende acabar con el manglar, quieren dividir la isla, y no se ha entendido que es más caro restaurar que tener imaginación con proyectos turísticos que permitan fortalecer a los manglares”, manifestó. Dijo que el promedio de gasto en la restauración de un manglar es de 60 mil pesos por hectárea y anualmente se pierde de 2 a 3 por ciento de los manglares.(Ciudad)

 

Protests in Chiapas against REDD: “Stop the land grabs!”

Protests in Chiapas against REDD: Stop the land grabs!
Villagers from Chiapas protested against REDD and the Green Economy during the Governors’ Climate and Forest Task Force meeting this week in Chiapas. Protesters played drums and chanted: “We do not want REDD;” “Here, there, the struggle will continue;” and “Zapata lives, the struggle continues”.
Protesters held signs reading, “Stop the landgrabs!” and “The government of Chiapas is lying to you. They haven’t informed us or consulted us. We don’t want REDD.”
The protests are reported in La Jornada (what follows is based on google translate – if anyone spots a mistake or has a better translation, please let me know. Thanks!). Eufemia Landa, from the Lacandon Jungle, read out a statement prepared by the protesters inside the GCF Task Force meeting. The statement describes REDD as land grabbing:
“We come here today in front of you, to denounce the programmes and projects of land grabbing and resources that bad governments have long attempted against us, now with a new excuse: climate change and the project called REDD.
“With REDD, rich businessmen and their government horsetraders will add a little business that makes the peasant more and more afraid: the carbon business in the form of smoke pollution which the jungles and forests of Chiapas would have to absorb and pointing out that, if we do not conserve the mountains, we are responsible for the production of carbon that  causes global warming and the impossibility of reducing it.”
No REDD!          No REDD! No land grabs     Protest in Chiapas     No information, no consultation
Before the GCF meeting started, REDDeldia CHIAPAS produced a statement opposing REDD, signed by many Latin American groups as well as networks and organisation from around the world.


En oposición al mecanismo oficial que “pretende poner precio a selvas y bosques”, las organizaciones discutirán “soluciones al cambio climático y sus implicaciones sobre la biodiversidad
 por Hermann Bellinghausen
f/Luz del Alba Belasko
  Los próximos días, San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas, será escenario de un excepcional debate sobre las políticas ambientales oficialistas y las propuestas alternativas de organizaciones independientes, especialistas y representaciones comunitarias de todo el continente. 
Servirá de catalizador para la reunión de gobiernos subnacionales de seis países, encabezada por el mandatario chiapaneco Juan Sabines Guerrero los próximos días 25, 26 y 27, para negociar la implementación del programa Reducción de Emisiones por Deforestación y Degradación Forestal (REDD plus). 
La promoción de compensaciones subnacionales de REDD por parte de la Fuerza de Tarea de gobernadores para el clima y los bosques (GCF por sus siglas en inglés) “puede agudizar la crisis climática al permitir que las industrias sigan contaminando sin reducciones reales de emisiones de carbono por deforestación”, explicó Paloma Neuman, de Greenpeace, al presentar el documento Espejitos por aire, que plantea una crítica revisionista del proyecto gubernamental. 
 Se efectuarán dos encuentros independientes que plantean un rechazo más frontal al mecanismo trasnacional iniciado por el ex gobernador de California Arnold Schwarzenegger. Uno lo convoca la Vía Campesina.
 
El otro, un abanico de decenas de organizaciones de todo el continente, que incluye a comunidades de la región Amador Hernández en la selva Lacandona, a organizaciones afectadas por la “economía verde”, así como Otros Mundos, Amigos de la Tierra Internacional, Nat Brasil, Indigenous Enviromental Network, Red de Mujeres Indígenas sobre Biodiversidad de América Latina y el Caribe. 
En oposición al mecanismo oficial que “pretende poner precio a selvas y bosques”, las organizaciones discutirán “soluciones al cambio climático y sus implicaciones sobre la biodiversidad y los pueblos originarios” durante la Semana Popular contra REDD y sus gobiernos. Los convocantes sostienen que el mecanismo “no respeta los derechos de pueblos indígenas”.  Las comunidades de Chiapas “no han sido suficientemente informadas ni consultadas, ni el programa prevé la pertinencia cultural de sus objetivos y medios”. REDD “incentiva la destrucción de la biodiversidad”, añaden. “Los estados subnacionales, las empresas y los organismos multilaterales conceptualizan el término de bosque al incluir plantaciones cuya sobrevivencia demanda grandes volúmenes de agrotóxicos y agua”.
 
 El mecanismo “no soluciona el cambio climático ni se enfoca en la urgente disminución de gases en los países industrializados, y permite que sigan contaminando mediante la ‘compensación’”. La falta de permanencia del carbono forestal capturado hace de REDD “un engaño”, que sin embargo “responsabiliza a las comunidades indígenas y campesinas del sur intertropical” como “sumideros del dióxido de carbono que los países del norte industrial emiten”, obligándolas a constituir reservas boscosas, o las criminaliza si se oponen.
 Bajo el esquema de REDD se materializa el desalojo de los pueblos “para arrasar las selvas y dar lugar a plantaciones”. Los se quedaron en sus territorios, “al disminuir sensiblemente el precio mundial de los biocombustibles han sido encarcelados por tumbar las palmas aceiteras”. 

Según los convocantes de la Semana Popular, el mecanismo REDD “divide y enfrenta a las comunidades” y es “contrainsurgente”. La aceptación del proyecto en Chiapas por la Comunidad Lacandona, “un pueblo indígena inventado por el gobierno hace 40 años para llevar adelante su negocio de la extracción de maderas finas”, confronta a las comunidades vecinas de Montes Azules. En abril de 2011, recuerdan, “en ceremonia oficial, el gobernador les entregó armas y uniformes para hacer rondas en el perímetro colindante con las comunidades tzeltales en resistencia que se oponen al paso de la llamada brecha Lacandona, que consolidaría los contratos de despojo”. 
 El mecanismo “promueve la descampesinización”, es “antidemocrático” y “un robo a la Nación” porque su “impostura climática pretende trasnacionalizar la biodiversidad del trópico húmedo mexicano”. Crea bases para la especulación de bonos de carbono forestal, un “comercio del aire” que impacta “la propiedad y control de la tierra al crear nuevos regímenes de privatización”.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------






 
Jeff Conant, Friends of the Earth, U.S.
24 septiembre 2012
Buenos dias a todas y a todos. Es un honor poder estar aqui en tierra Chiapaneca. Quiero empezar por dar mis gracias a los que organizaron este evento, y a todos que me han recibido aca. Estoy hablando hoy como representante de la organizacion Amigos de la Tierra, en estados unidos, pero es mas, como un ciudadano del estado de California. Estoy hablando tambien como una persona que he pasado un buen rato en visitas a Chiapas. Los bosques, la tierra, y los pueblos de Chiapas tienen un lugar muy especial en mi corazon.
Es asi como ciudadano de California, la septima economia mas grande del mundo, que quiero manifestar mi desacuerdo, y el desacuerdo de mucha gente y muchas organizaciones, con el acuerdo que se esta haciendo entre California, Acre, y Chiapas. Creemos  que este acuerdo va a resultar mal para Chiapas, y va resultar mal para California.
En una carta que enviamos al gobernador Jerry Brown el mes pasado, manifestamos que, “mientras California puede y debe tomar un rol muy importante en la lucha contra la crisis climatica, desarollando una programa de REDD+ basado en compensaciones y bonos de carbono riesga desgastar recursos finitos en un mechanismo de politica que sera ineficiente, inefectivo, y que puede ser muy nocivo a las vidas y las viviendas de pueblos indigenas y comunidades locales.”
Porque dijimos esto al gobernador de California, y porque lo estoy repitiendo a ustedes hoy?
Son tres razones principales: las compensaciones no funcionen para bajar emisiones; los programas de REDD en general parecen servir a los grandes intereses economicas sin atacar a raiz el problema de cambio climatico; y la supuesta proteccion de bosques, si esta implementado sin consideracion para los derechos y las perspectivas de los pueblos indigenas, genera conflictos, despojo, y hasta violencia.
Uno por uno: creemos que la industria en California debe reducir sus emisiones en la fuente de los emisiones, y no atraves de mechanismos del mercado, como son las compensaciones.
En 2006, el estado de California aprobo una ley que requiere que el estado a reducir sus emisiones a niveles de 1990, por al año 2020. Es una ley que a muchos ambientalistas nos gustó, por su compromiso a combatir a la crisis climatica, que creemos es el peor crisis que jamas ha enfrentado a la humanidad.
Pero hace dos años, introdujieron una nueva resolucion que le saque el corazón de la ley. Segun esto, hasta 20 por ciento de las reducciones de emisiones pueden hacerse a traves de compensaciones. Bueno, 20 porciento, dices, no es tan mal. Pero resulta que el mismo porcentaje – un 20 por ciento – de las emisiones del estado de California estan generados por las industrias grandes – los petroleras, las refinerias, la generacion electrica, las fabricas. Entonces, vimos que esta industrias iban a tener que bajar su contaminacion climatica solo en papel. Solo en papel, y no en el mundo real, donde vivimos todos nosotros.
Ahora, cuando piensen en California, ustedes a lo major veen imagenes de playas bonitas, de gente blanca y rica, de Hollywood, de California pues, no es cierto?
Pero resulta que la mitad de la gente en California viven dentro de diez kilometros a una mayor fuente de contaminacion. Y resulta que, de esa gente, la mayoridad son pobres, y son Africano-Americans, o Mexicanos, o imigrantes de algun lugar, que fueron a California buscando el sueño americano. Y resulta que, por vivir tan cerca las industrias, estan sufriendo padicimientos cronicas de la salud, como el asma, el cancer, la enfisima, y otras enfermedades provocadas por la contaminacion.
Para ellos, la contaminacion, y la crisis climatica, no es abstracto – es un hecho que les efecta dia tras dia. Y la idea que las grandes industrias pueden seguir contaminando con la compra de bonos de carbono, vendidos de Chiapas o de Acre, o de cualquier otro lugar, las cae muy mal.
Es por eso que, el año pasado, varios grupos de justicia ambiental lanzaron un juicio en contra de esta provision. Pero, por mucha intervencion de las fuerzas de la industria, perdieron el caso en la ultima ronda, y la ley sigue en marcha. Y las industrias siguen provocando canceres a nivel local, y aumentando a la crisis climatica a nivel global.
Donde vivo yo, tenemos el gusto de ser anfitriones a la refineria mas grande del estado, del petrolero Chevron. Chevron es el negocio mas grande en California; es el mas responsable para las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero; y es una de las diez empresas mas ricas en el mundo. El año pasado, Chevron registro ganancias de lucro de $27 billiones de dolares.
Bueno, el 4 de agosto del mes pasado, hubo un incendio en esa planta de Chevron. Un pequeño inciendio, que solo duro unos cuantas horas, y lleno todo el cielo con un nube toxico. Dentro de dos dias, 9000 personas fueron al hospital con problemas respiratorias. Y Chevron no solo no quiere pagar los daños, no quiere tomar responsibilidad por sus emisiones. Prefiere que el estado de California lo subsidia con compensaciones, ganados en su negocio con Chiapas. Y esto, a muchos de nosotros, nos parece criminal.
En punto dos voy a ser muy breve, porque los detalles son tan complicados que ningun ser humano los puede llegar a entender. Pero, en terminos fundamentals, las compensaciones, los offsets como los llamamos en ingles, son una forma de especulacion del Mercado tanto como los famosos derivatives que nos llevaron a la crisis financiera. Hay un sin fin de estudios que muestran que no solo no bajan las emisiones, sino que evitan la implementacion de cualquier medida real de hacerlo. Y los espaculadores mas grandes en el Mercado de carbono son las mismas empresas de energia que van ganando en primer lugar. Y esto nos parece, tambien, criminal.
Punto tres: lo que el estado de Chiapas, y el estado de Acre tambien, estan presentando como proteccion de bosques se ve muy bonito a los ambienalistas en California. Pero visto mas de cerca, sabemos que las dinamicas de proteccion de los bosques son tantito mas complicados: que sin tenencia a la tierra, y sin reconocimiento de los derechos humanos y los derechos indigenas, y sin consultacion previa, libre e informado, proteccion de bosques facilmente se manifiesta como engaño, despojo, y desalojo.
Cuando vi en primer lugar este pamfleto que el gobierno de Chiapas distribuyó en la cumbre de Cambio Climatico de las naciones unidas en Cancún en 2010, pense, que interesante, el estado de Chiapas, que tiene tanta historia de conflictos agrarios, ya esta invertiendo en programas de detener al cambio climatico. Y cuando vi este dato, que entre 2006 y 2010 el estado habia evitada la deforestacion por la via de remover 172 grupos o comunidades de las areas naturales protegidas, pense, de que se trata esto? Bueno, Flaviano ya les dije de que se trata: del despojo de comunidades supuestamente 'iregulares,' pero que tienen decadas, si no mas, viviendo de manera pacifica en sus lugares. 
Para los que estamos en desacuerdo con los programas de REDD, es en gran parte porque entendemos que a los gobiernos del mundo les importa nada los derechos de los pueblos indigenas. Demandamos e insistimos que programas de REDD, si es que tienen que proceder, a fuerza deben basarse en respeto a los derechos de los pueblos indigenas, claras reglamentos de tenenica de la tierra, y procesos de consulta y participacion amplias, transparentes, y integrados en las perspectivas y las cosmovisiones de los pueblos. Y si es que logran hacer todo esto, no son entonces programas de REDD, sino otra cosa, porque vemos que los programas de REDD, iniciados por los elites del gran capital y apoyados por las instituciones inhumanas como el banco mundial, no son para detener la crisis climatica, sino para escapar de la crisis financiera.
En California, cuando los grupos de justicia ambiental – los que hablan con, y por la gente mas impactada por la contaminacion industrial – estaban consultadas sobre esta ley, dijeron rotundamente que no estaban de acuerdo. Y por los intereses de la industria, la ley procedio igual. Y si este es lo que paso en California, donde habia consulta, que va a pasar en Chiapas?
Para terminar, la semana pasada, hablemos con un official en el gobierno de California, quien nos dijo que, por razones economicas, el gobierno del estado no viene a Chiapas para participar de manera directa en los eventos de esta semana. Y, aparte del hecho de que son buenos ambientalistas por no volar y contribuir al calentamiento global, me parece una gran lastima. Es una pena, porque lo veo muy importante que los oficiales del estado donde vivo, y que armó este acuerdo en primer lugar, hablen con las comunidades que no estan de acuerdo. Porque proteger al medio ambiente no es solo una cuestion de bajar la emisiones de gases. Es una cuestion de entender y enfrentar el contexto social, el contexto cultural, hasta el contexto espiritual. Un acuerdo así no puede hacer solo un acuerdo entre los estados, debe ser tambien un acerdo entre los pueblos. Entonces, en el regreso a California, vamos a seguir hablando con los oficiales del estado, y les vamos a señalar que, tanto en Chiapas como en California, todos queremos combatir al cambio climatico – eso si – pero no todos estamos de acuerdo con sus planes de como hacerlo.



Debatirán en Chiapas propuestas políticas ambientales oficialistas y alternativas 




En oposición al mecanismo oficial que “pretende poner precio a selvas y bosques”, las organizaciones discutirán “soluciones al cambio climático y sus implicaciones sobre la biodiversidad
Hermann Bellinghausen
Publicado: 23/09/2012 14:33 en La Jornada

México DF. Los próximos días, San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas, será escenario de un excepcional debate sobre las políticas ambientales oficialistas y las propuestas alternativas de organizaciones independientes, especialistas y representaciones comunitarias de todo el continente.
Servirá de catalizador para la reunión de gobiernos subnacionales de seis países, encabezada por el mandatario chiapaneco Juan Sabines Guerrero los próximos días 25, 26 y 27, para negociar la implementación del programa Reducción de Emisiones por Deforestación y Degradación Forestal (REDD plus).
La promoción de compensaciones subnacionales de REDD por parte de la Fuerza de Tarea de gobernadores para el clima y los bosques (GCF por sus siglas en inglés) “puede agudizar la crisis climática al permitir que las industrias sigan contaminando sin reducciones reales de emisiones de carbono por deforestación”, explicó Paloma Neuman, de Greenpeace, al presentar el documento Espejitos por aire, que plantea una crítica revisionista del proyecto gubernamental.
Se efectuarán dos encuentros independientes que plantean un rechazo más frontal al mecanismo trasnacional iniciado por el ex gobernador de California Arnold Schwarzenegger. Uno lo convoca la Vía Campesina. El otro, un abanico de decenas de organizaciones de todo el continente, que incluye a comunidades de la región Amador Hernández en la selva Lacandona, a organizaciones afectadas por la “economía verde”, así como Otros Mundos, Amigos de la Tierra Internacional, Nat Brasil, Indigenous Enviromental Network, Red de Mujeres Indígenas sobre Biodiversidad de América Latina y el Caribe.
En oposición al mecanismo oficial que “pretende poner precio a selvas y bosques”, las organizaciones discutirán “soluciones al cambio climático y sus implicaciones sobre la biodiversidad y los pueblos originarios” durante la Semana Popular contra REDD y sus gobiernos. Los convocantes sostienen que el mecanismo “no respeta los derechos de pueblos indígenas”. Las comunidades de Chiapas “no han sido suficientemente informadas ni consultadas, ni el programa prevé la pertinencia cultural de sus objetivos y medios”.
REDD “incentiva la destrucción de la biodiversidad”, añaden. “Los estados subnacionales, las empresas y los organismos multilaterales conceptualizan el término de bosque al incluir plantaciones cuya sobrevivencia demanda grandes volúmenes de agrotóxicos y agua”. El mecanismo “no soluciona el cambio climático ni se enfoca en la urgente disminución de gases en los países industrializados, y permite que sigan contaminando mediante la ‘compensación’”.
La falta de permanencia del carbono forestal capturado hace de REDD “un engaño”, que sin embargo “responsabiliza a las comunidades indígenas y campesinas del sur intertropical” como “sumideros del dióxido de carbono que los países del norte industrial emiten”, obligándolas a constituir reservas boscosas, o las criminaliza si se oponen. Bajo el esquema de REDD se materializa el desalojo de los pueblos “para arrasar las selvas y dar lugar a plantaciones”. Los se quedaron en sus territorios, “al disminuir sensiblemente el precio mundial de los biocombustibles han sido encarcelados por tumbar las palmas aceiteras”.
Según los convocantes de la Semana Popular, el mecanismo REDD “divide y enfrenta a las comunidades” y es “contrainsurgente”. La aceptación del proyecto en Chiapas por la Comunidad Lacandona, “un pueblo indígena inventado por el gobierno hace 40 años para llevar adelante su negocio de la extracción de maderas finas”, confronta a las comunidades vecinas de
Montes Azules. En abril de 2011, recuerdan, “en ceremonia oficial, el gobernador les entregó armas y uniformes para hacer rondas en el perímetro colindante con las comunidades tzeltales en resistencia que se oponen al paso de la llamada brecha Lacandona, que consolidaría los contratos de despojo”.
El mecanismo “promueve la descampesinización”, es “antidemocrático” y “un robo a la Nación” porque su “impostura climática pretende trasnacionalizar la biodiversidad del trópico húmedo mexicano”. Crea bases para la especulación de bonos de carbono forestal, un “comercio del aire” que impacta “la propiedad y control de la tierra al crear nuevos regímenes de privatización”.
La posición de Greenpeace Internacional es menos extrema: “Un GCF redirigido evitaría ser un obstáculo para convertirse en un aliado en la batalla contra el cambio climático y proteger los bosques y los derechos de los pueblos”, explicó Sebastian Bock, vocero del organismo.

 

People’s Forum Against REDD+ in Chiapas, Mexico

noticia redd monitor

People’s Forum Against REDD+ in Chiapas, Mexico
This week, in parallel to the Governors’ Climate and Forests Task Force that is meeting in Chiapas, Mexico, REDDelion-CHIAPAS is hosting a people’s forum against REDD.
The people’s forum consists of a series of meetings, featuring videos and discussion. Presentations will be given by representatives from communities in the region of Amador Hernández in the Lacandon Jungle of Chiapas, and by organisations from Brazil, Guatemala and the USA.
More information about the forum and critical information about REDD is available here (in Spanish). For more about the GCF meeting, the media kit for the meeting can be downloaded here (pdf file 2.7 MB).
Here’s the press release about the Public Forum:
REDDelion-CHIAPAS To Host a People’s Forum Against REDD+ in Chiapas
24 September, 2012
During a week of open public forums, community groups, academics, and civil society organizations will gather in San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas, to analyze REDD+ and its orientation toward privatizing forests and jungles.
From September 25-28, 2012, sub national governments from six countries will arrive in San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas, México, to advance policies of Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+), a shadow program with which they hope to privatize tropical forests under the pretext of the climate crisis. The 17 state or provincial governments expected to participate are: Chiapas and Campeche in México; Aceh, Central Kalimantan, East Kalimantan, West Kalimantan, Papua and West Papua in Indonesia; Acre, Amapá, Amazonas, Mato Grosso and Pará in Brasil; California and Illinois in the United States; Madre de Dios in Perú; and Cross River State in Nigeria.
These governments are laying plans to advance, by way of this shadow mechanism, the privatization of Mother Earth, in order to appropriate her resources and services under the guise of aggressive conservation programs; to elevate the unsustainable production of biofuels, with all of their destructive impacts; and to fragment our cultures and community organizations, the primary historic barriers to capital in our forests and jungles. All of this comes clothed in the concept of the “green economy”.
Under the REDD+ program, the rights of Indigenous Peoples are not respected or taken into account. Indigenous communities who have lived in and stewarded forests for centuries are now shouldered with the responsibility for capturing the carbon dioxide emitted by industrialized countries. At the same time, if they interfere in the protection of forests identied as REDD+ project areas, whether by collecting firewood or harvesting medicinal plants or other forest products, they are criminalized
We consider REDD+ to be a false solution to the climate crisis that enables the countries of the North to continue polluting at the cost of the further impoverishment of peasant farmers and Indigenous Peoples, and their expulsion from their lands and territories. We recognize the principle cause of the climate crisis and the destruction of Mother Earth to be the globalized market economy. History has made clear that the primary effect of capital has been the destruction of our natural commons and our cultures. We therefore reject market mechanism such as REDD+.
REDD+ considers monocultures of African palm, jatropha, and eucalyptus to be equivalent to forests or jungles for purposes of absorbing industrial carbon emissions; therefore their cultivation is encouraged under REDD+ programs. We strongly condemn this approach, not only because industrial tree plantations are ‘green deserts’ devoid of biodiversity, but also because their demand for water and agrochemicals causes grave environmental and health problems. The economic benefits of biofuel and cellulose plantations go directly into the coffers of large multinational companies.
Further, we believe that the promotion of REDD+ in biodiverse regions such as the Lacandon Jungle serves to mask the interests of large pharmaceutical companies to patent genetic resources. Significant investments have already been made toward these ends.
United Nations and private REDD+ initiatives are formally tied to global discussions on climate change. But REDD+ agreements are also increasingly being promoted between sub national governments, such as the agreement between the states of Chiapas, Acre, and California signed in 2010, two weeks before the United Nations COP 16 Framework Convention on Climate Change in Cancún, México.
In light of these concerns, REDDeldia calls on the public to attend a series of conferences, videos, and discussions on September 25th, 26th and 27th from 17:30 to 20:30, at Café Museo, María Adelina Flores No. 10. Representatives from impacted communities in the region of Amador Hernández in the Lacandon Jungle of Chiapas, as well as organizations from Brazil, Guatemala and the United States will present a broad analysis of the national and international implications of REDD+ as a new form of privatizing and commercializing nature.
For more information: reddeldia.blogspot.mx
Edgardo Ayala (Noticias Aliadas)

Ambientalistas e indígenas contra mercado de carbono

06/09/2012 Envíe un comentario Imprima el texto de esta página

Banco Mundial impulsa programa que podría traer consecuencias ambientales y sociales negativas.
Ambientalistas e indígenas centroamericanos redoblan esfuerzos para evitar que gobiernos de la región participen en un programa impulsado por el Banco Mundial (BM) que busca incluir a esas naciones en el mercado de carbono, porque afirman que tendrá efectos negativos para el medio ambiente y para las personas.

Organizaciones sociales han enviado cartas al Fondo Cooperativo para el Carbono de los Bosques (FCPF, por sus siglas en inglés), la instancia del BM que coordina el mencionado programa, exigiendo que sean rechazadas las peticiones de ingreso hechas por gobiernos del istmo o que se aclaren una serie de deficiencias e irregularidades detectadas.

“Hacemos un llamado a los gobiernos de Centroamérica (…) y al FCPF del BM a que revisen y corrijan sus actuaciones”, reza la resolución del Encuentro Regional sobre Industrias Extractivas y Políticas Climáticas en Territorios Indígenas de Mesoamérica, celebrado el 17 de agosto en San Salvador, en el que participaron organizaciones indígenas de la región.

Varios gobiernos centroamericanos han iniciado ya el proceso para participar del Programa de Reducción de Emisiones por Deforestación y Degradación de Bosques (REDD, por sus siglas en inglés), coordinado por el FCPF. Una vez aprobados todos los requerimientos de ingreso, en manos del llamado Comité de Participantes, los países podrán ingresar al mercado de compraventa de carbono del FCPF, de US$215 millones.

El Salvador envió el 1 de junio al FCPF una nueva versión del documento con el que pretende ir cumpliendo con los requisitos para entrar a REDD en el proceso conocido como de preparación, que puede extenderse hasta finales de año. Los requisitos tienen que ver con el desarrollo de sistemas para monitorear, medir y verificar emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero (GEI), que causan el calentamiento global. También incluyen la puesta en marcha de salvaguardas sociales y ambientales, las cuales no se están ejecutando, según las organizaciones demandantes. Honduras, Nicaragua y Panamá también se encuentran en el mismo proceso.

REDD es un complejo mecanismo de desarrollo limpio (MDL) incluido en el Protocolo de Kioto sobre cambio climático, aprobado en 1997, cuyo objetivo es reducir las emisiones de GEI. Cada país que ha ratificado el Protocolo de Kioto tiene asignadas cuotas de emisión de GEI que no debe sobrepasar. Si un país o empresa ha sobrepasado esos límites y no cumple con sus cuotas de reducción de GEI, tiene la posibilidad de comprar créditos o bonos de carbono.

Un bono de carbono es el derecho a enviar a la atmósfera una tonelada de dióxido de carbono (CO2), uno de los seis GEI. Esto quiere decir, por ejemplo, que si una empresa que tiene un límite de emisión de 100,000 TM de CO2 anuales, supera esa meta y emite 10,000 TM más, debe adquirir bonos de carbono equivalentes a ese exceso. A su vez, los proyectos que dejan de emitir GEI pueden obtener Certificados de Reducción de Emisiones (CER); cada CER representa una TM que se deja de emitir a la atmósfera y puede ser vendido en los mercados de bonos de carbono. A este sistema se le conoce como MDL y REDD tiene que ver con temas forestales, ya que la quema o tumba de bosques generan GEI.

Estos bonos se negocian en dos tipos de mercado: el oficial, regulado por el Grupo Intergubernamental sobre Cambio Climático (IPCC), que establece las certificaciones, y el voluntario no regulado, en el cual ciertas empresas compran bonos de mercados futuros, como si fuera una bolsa de valores.


Críticas a REDD
El programa es duramente cuestionado por organizaciones civiles centroamericanas e internacionales, porque advierten que esa es una forma de que los países ricos soslayen su responsabilidad de reducir sus emisiones de GEI.

“En lugar de implementar políticas que lleven a una reducción de sus emisiones, las naciones industrializadas quieren seguir con sus mismos patrones de consumo”, dijo a Noticias Aliadas Yvette Aguilar, experta salvadoreña en cambio climático. “Y mejor pagan a los países pobres para que lo hagan por ellos”.

En junio pasado, la Coordinadora Nacional de los Pueblos Indígenas de Panamá se quejó en una carta dirigida a funcionarios de la Autoridad Nacional del Ambiente y a la representante de las Naciones Unidas en Panamá, Kim Bolduc, por no destinar los recursos financieros prometidos para desarrollar proyectos sociales en los territorios indígenas.

En principio esos fondos estarían disponibles como parte del esfuerzo gubernamental para incluir a los pueblos autóctonos en el programa REDD que el gobierno está impulsando con el auspicio de las Naciones Unidas, conocido como UN-REDD.

“Nos sentimos utilizados en este proceso”, dice la carta.

Poco antes, una veintena de organizaciones civiles salvadoreñas escribieron también al FCPF, rechazando el proceso de inclusión a REDD en el que se encuentra el gobierno, y demandando que esa petición sea vetada porque de aprobarse “habría graves implicaciones para la sociedad salvadoreña, aumentando su vulnerabilidad y la frecuencia de los desastres”.

Eso, en la medida en que el programa no ataca el problema de fondo, como es el que las naciones que más contaminan, las industrializadas, hagan un esfuerzo serio por bajar sus emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero, dicen los expertos consultados.

Por su parte, la Confederación de Pueblos Autóctonos de Honduras (CONPAH) denunció en febrero pasado que el gobierno de ese país está dispuesto a llevar a cabo el proceso para participar del programa REDD sin consultar a esas comunidades indígenas y afrohondureñas.

“Es una violación a nuestros derechos, ya que como pueblos desconocemos el contenido y el alcance del programa, y tampoco se ha obtenido el consentimiento libre e informado como lo mandan las directrices del FCPF”, señala la CONPAH en una carta dirigida al ministro de Recursos Naturales y Ambiente de ese país, Rigoberto Cuéllar.

La CONPAH exigió la suspensión de toda actividad relativa al REDD en los territorios indígenas y afrohondureños.


Reducción de emisiones
La experta salvadoreña Maritza Erazo dijo a Noticias Aliadas que esos programas REDD pueden implicar el desalojo de las comunidades que habitan en los bosques, pues se deben cumplir a cabalidad los contratos que obligan a mantener intactas las áreas boscosas, lo que implica que no se pueden realizar ningún tipo de actividades productivas.

“Cuando este mecanismo se aplique, eso puede afectar a las comunidades indígenas o campesinas que allí viven, porque puede cambiarles su forma de vida; ellas ya no podrían por ejemplo hacer uso de la madera, para viviendas o combustible, porque eso podría considerarse como degradación del bosque”, dijo Erazo.

Los expertos consultados concordaron en que, además de los efectos para las comunidades y las personas, es el planeta el que está en juego, si no se reducen las emisiones de GEI. Y el programa REDD permite que las naciones industrializadas, las que más contaminan, no las reduzcan.

En las conferencias internacionales sobre cambio climático de Cancún, México, celebrada en noviembre del 2010, y la de Durban, Sudáfrica, en noviembre del 2011, las naciones industrializadas se desligaron de la obligación de bajar sus emisiones, como lo había establecido el Protocolo de Kioto, y en su lugar han ofrecido negociar en el 2015 una reducción que recién entrará en vigor en el 2020.

Ángel Ibarra, presidente de la no gubernamental Unidad Ecológica Salvadoreña, dijo a Noticias Aliadas que, así como está impactando el cambio climático, se necesita que las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero bajen en un 50% hacia el 2020 para que el aumento de la temperatura del planeta no supere el 2°.

“De lo contrario, la temperatura subirá a 4°, con serias repercusiones para la vida”, acotó.

El mercado de carbono se apodera de los manglares

La capacidad de almacenamiento de carbono de los manglares y varios otros ecosistemas costeros, como las marismas de agua salada, las praderas marinas, los bosques de algas y los humedales, ha pasado a ser noticia.
Trabajando en equipo, científicos universitarios e investigadores forestales han examinado el contenido de carbono de los manglares. Las conclusiones de uno de esos estudios, realizado en la región del Indo-Pacífico, fueron publicadas por Nature Geoscience. Se encontró que los manglares almacenan por hectárea hasta cuatro veces más carbono que la mayoría de los demás bosques tropicales del mundo, y esto se atribuye, en parte, a sus suelos profundos, ricos en materia orgánica, en los que prosperan los mangles. El complejo sistema radicular del manglar, que fija las plantas en los sedimentos submarinos, frena las aguas de la marea, permitiendo a la materia orgánica e inorgánica permanecer en la superficie del suelo. La escasa cantidad de oxígeno aminora el ritmo de la descomposición, de modo que buena parte del carbono queda acumulado allí. De hecho, los manglares almacenan sólo en su suelo más carbono que toda la biomasa y el suelo de la mayoría de los bosques tropicales.
Cuando se cambia el destino de la tierra, buena parte del carbono almacenado se libera a la atmósfera, agravando el problema del cambio climático. En los últimos 50 años, los manglares han sufrido una rápida disminución de entre un 30 y un 50 por ciento.
El Protocolo de Kyoto de la Convención de las Naciones Unidas sobre el Cambio Climático ha aumentado su colección de falsas soluciones de mercado al adoptar un nuevo método para calcular el dióxido de carbono de la atmósfera captado y almacenado por los manglares; esto ha dado lugar a soluciones para el cambio climático llamadas de “carbono azul” (ver el Boletín nº 167 del WRM).
Dicha metodología fue desarrollada por la UICN, Ramsar y Sylvestrum, en asociación con el grupo transnacional francés de productos alimenticios Danone, para el Mecanismo de Desarrollo Limpio (MDL) del Protocolo de Kyoto. Este mecanismo permite a los grandes países industriales evitar su responsabilidad histórica de reducir sus propias emisiones de carbono, invirtiendo en proyectos en el Sur que, supuestamente, evitan esas emisiones. Los defensores de la compensación de carbono argumentan que “la solución” para preservar los manglares y combatir el cambio climático consistiría en incentivar que dichos ecosistemas no sean tocados, ofreciendo a cambio créditos de carbono.
De este modo, los manglares serán el blanco de grandes compañías ansiosas por comprar créditos de carbono para compensar la contaminación que generan continuamente. Un ejemplo de esto es el Wetland Carbon Partnership del mencionado Grupo Danone. Se trata de un emprendimiento de 2008, que fomenta la aprobación de proyectos que generen grandes cantidades de créditos de carbono, en el marco del MDL o del denominado mercado voluntario. Para junio de 2011, se habían presentado no menos de 25 proyectos. Danone ya invirtió en dos proyectos piloto, en Senegal e India.
El sistema de compensación de carbono propuesto por Danone significa que la empresa seguirá quemando combustibles fósiles y aumentando el volumen de gases de efecto invernadero de la atmósfera, e intentará al mismo tiempo neutralizar la contaminación almacenándola en algún manglar del planeta.
Sin embargo, esto implica aumentar el volumen neto de carbono en la biosfera, es decir la atmósfera, los seres vivos, la vegetación y el suelo. Si bien los mangles y el suelo absorben carbono y lo almacenan, este almacenamiento es temporario y forma parte del ciclo del carbono atmosférico. En cambio, los combustibles fósiles extraídos del subsuelo y quemados por empresas como Danone aumentan de forma permanente el volumen de carbono de la biosfera. Dicho carbono de origen fósil no forma parte del ciclo del carbono atmosférico y termina aumentando la cantidad de gases de efecto invernadero responsables del cambio climático, sin que haya posibilidad alguna de volver a enterrarlo.
El modelo de producción a gran escala y de distribución comercial de millones de artículos, muchos de ellos superfluos y descartables, sin otro objetivo que el consumo excesivo, genera un gran volumen de emisiones de carbono y está en el origen de la actual crisis climática. También es causa subyacente de la desaparición de los manglares. El mercado del carbono es hijo de dicho modelo, y difícilmente servirá para solucionar el problema que este último ha creado.
Artículo basado en información obtenida de: “Mangroves among the most carbon-rich forests in the Tropics”, junio de 2011, http://www.salvaleforeste.it/en/201106231474/
mangroves-qmong-the-most-carbon-rich-forests-in-the-tropics.html
.


 

REDD, la brecha lacandona y nuevas formas de despojo

Silvia Ribeiro *
Basados en un acuerdo entre los gobiernos de Chiapas y de California, con la colaboración de instituciones como El Colegio de la Frontera Sur (Ecosur) y trasnacionales conservacionistas, avanzan en Chiapas los proyectos llamados REDD, que significan la privatización del aire de los bosques, despojando a las comunidades que los habitan de su derecho al territorio.
Para definir lo que se puede vender en indulgencias de carbono al gobierno de California y a las empresas contaminantes que lo sostienen, la administración chiapaneca intenta, como otras anteriores desde hace décadas, abrir una brecha en la Selva Lacandona que delimite la zona a comercializar, renovando agresiones y despojos a las comunidades indígenas. En marzo de 2011, funcionarios del gobierno estatal dijeron a la organización Justicia Ecológica Global (www.globaljusticeecology.org) que sólo les falta unir la brecha en la zona de las cañadas, donde hay comunidades zapatistas.
Justamente, el intento de demarcación en la zona lacandona hace cuatro décadas, a favor de uno de los siete pueblos indígenas que la habitan fue lo que motivó la creación de una unión de todos los otros pueblos de la región contra la brecha lacandona, resistencia entretejida con el origen del EZLN.
En 1971, el gobierno concedió 614 mil 321 hectáreas de selva a 66 comuneros lacandones (que no es su nombre original, ni son pobladores originarios de esa región), exacerbando el caos de sobreposición de títulos de tierra que ya existía en la región. Nunca se marcaron los linderos (la resistencia a la brecha lo impidió), pero desde entonces los lacandones son quienes firman el consentimiento a proyectos y contratos que les presenta el gobierno, sean madereros, turísticos o como ahora, REDD. Las otras comunidades fueron desplazadas o viven bajo amenaza permanente.
REDD (Reducción de Emisiones por Deforestación y Degradación evitada de bosques) es supuestamente un programa para evitar la emisión de gases con efecto invernadero provocados por la deforestación, pagando con bonos de carbono a las compañías para que deforesten un poco menos. O a las comunidades, para que técnicos foráneos certificados les hagan un plan de manejo, que en la práctica significa que no pueden usar el bosque y pierden autonomía sobre el territorio.
Para las empresas es un tremendo negocio, porque pueden seguir contaminando y además revender parte de los bonos a un precio mayor a otras empresas. O sea, no les cuesta nada y burlan las leyes ambientales. El 7 de abril 2011, Greenpeace Internacional publicó el informe Bad influence denunciando cómo la consultora internacional McKinsey –que tiene larga historia de asesorar privatizaciones y ahora asesora a países que quieren conseguir dinero de REDD–, había hecho una base de cálculos falseados para los gobiernos de Guyana y Congo, para mostrar una perspectiva de deforestación futura mucho mayor que la real. De ese modo, podrían incluso aumentar la deforestación y además cobrar REDD, alegando que con ello deforestan menos de lo proyectado.
En el caso del pago a comunidades, en México hay ejemplos concretos del despojo que pueden producir estos esquemas, ya que los pagos por servicios ambientales forestales se basan en mecanismos parecidos. Con la excusa de pagarle una modesta suma a las comunidades para cuidar el bosque, en realidad se les despoja del manejo del territorio. En Oaxaca, hay casos donde al término del contrato de pago por servicios ambientales (cinco años), el gobierno decretó sus territorios áreas naturales protegidas o áreas prioritarias para servicios ambientales, extendiendo por 30 años los contratos, contra la voluntad de la comunidad. No pudiendo usar su bosque, que es el sustento de sus medios tradicionales de vida, tienen que irse para sobrevivir, aunque siguen teniendo los títulos de propiedad.
Es parte de lo que se pretende hacer en las selvas y bosques de Chiapas: vender a trasnacionales el carbono que absorben los bosques y para dar garantías a este negocio, desalojar a las comunidades del bosque, idealmente desplazándolas para engrosar otro negocio del gobierno: las llamadas ciudades rurales sustentables. Ya desplazados y desarraigados, sin servicios ni medios de vida, la generosa oferta del gobierno de Chiapas es que sean peones en las plantaciones para biocombustibles.
Los proyectos REDD en México no están formalmente definidos como tales, pero el gobernador Juan Sabines ya comenzó a pagar a selectos comuneros para mostrar su voluntad de crear una buena base para los negocios de las trasnacionales californianas, con recursos públicos. Necesita además cumplir con requisitos técnicos, como crear una línea base de cobertura vegetal y una proyección de cambios futuros en el uso de suelo y la biomasa, para luego poder decir que hubo menos deforestación, o por la razón que sea, que se absorbe carbono. En esas maniobras le asisten instituciones como Ecosur y el Colegio de Posgraduados, además de un comité REDD+ nacional, donde está Conafor, Conabio, Semarnat y otros entes del gobierno federal, con comerciantes de carbono y organizaciones conservacionistas que promueven negocios con la biodiversidad.
Para definir la capacidad de retención de carbono, se están usando tecnologías satelitales combinadas con fotografías hiperespectrales y monitoreo directo de algunas zonas (para lo cual ya están entrenando comuneros). Se obtienen así resultados muy definidos, no sólo de fauna y flora sino también de los humanos que están allí, lo cual es toda una base para vigilar a comunidades y además, para la biopiratería de última generación.
*Investigadora del Grupo ETC

 

CARTA ABIERTA a los GOBIERNOS NACIONALES

con motivo del 21 de septiembre, Día Internacional de Lucha contra el Monocultivo de Árboles
También disponible en portugués, francés e inglés
La humanidad se enfrenta a una crisis ambiental, económica y climática que amenaza su supervivencia. La destrucción de ecosistemas pone en peligro no sólo a las comunidades que dependen directamente de ellos sino también al planeta entero. Los centros de poder no han cuestionado el modelo de producción y de consumo del que son responsables. En cambio, promueven falsas soluciones que permiten seguir acumulando riquezas a quienes crearon la crisis, mientras la mayoría de la población del mundo ve deteriorarse su nivel de vida.
Hoy somos testigos de la confluencia de dos procesos: la incorporación de nuevos aspectos de la vida a la economía de mercado, y la financierización de la propia economía, que incluye la especulación sobre nuevos productos “verdes”.
Las sociedades capitalistas siempre se han apropiado de la naturaleza humana y no humana. Hoy, toda una serie de productos radicalmente nuevos están siendo desarrollados para la venta: el carbono, la biodiversidad, el agua, etc. Al mismo tiempo, los mercados financieros especulativos han obtenido cada vez más poder sobre el resto de la economía y de la vida, en respuesta a la crisis capitalista que comenzó en los años 1970. Hace su entrada la Economía Verde, respaldada por las Naciones Unidas y racionalizada por el argumento de que sólo fijando un precio a la naturaleza se puede lograr conservarla. Los llamados “servicios ecosistémicos”, presentados como productos frescos para el comercio y la especulación, son los encargados de salvar una economía que permanece centrada en el saqueo y la explotación.
Para los actores que se enriquecen con la financierización de la naturaleza – bancos, fondos de inversión, fondos de pensiones, compañías transnacionales – la Economía Verde no representa más que nuevas oportunidades de negocios. Actuando en tándem con las grandes organizaciones conservacionistas, se apropian de procesos de la ONU como las Convenciones sobre el Cambio Climático y sobre la Biodiversidad, y las usan para legitimar sus acciones.
La preservación de la naturaleza se convierte en un negocio, y restringe el acceso de las comunidades locales a zonas y bienes esenciales para su supervivencia. Los proyectos REDD y proto-REDD son un claro ejemplo de esto, como se subrayó en las reuniones de los pueblos durante la reciente Cumbre de la Tierra Río+20.
En muchos casos, quienes especulan con el “negocio de la naturaleza” son los mismos que se enriquecen destruyéndola. Mientras el capital financiero explora los “servicios ecosistémicos”, también continúa expandiendo sus intereses en actividades destructivas. Por ejemplo, es cada vez más común que los fondos de pensiones o de inversión de los países del Norte especulen e inviertan en grandes plantaciones industriales de árboles en los países del Sur. Los impactos negativos que esto tiene sobre los ecosistemas, la biodiversidad, las fuentes de agua y los medios de supervivencia de las comunidades locales han sido ampliamente demostrados.
Éste es un llamado a unir nuestras luchas para exigir que los gobiernos comiencen a desmantelar la especulación y la mercantilización de la vida, para contribuir a proteger los paisajes y los medios de subsistencia contra la destrucción y la desigualdad que se ven exacerbadas por la financierización.
Es por eso que, en el marco del 21 de septiembre, Día Internacional de Lucha contra los Monocultivos de Árboles, y en vísperas de la Undécima Reunión de la Conferencia de las Partes del Convenio sobre la Diversidad Biológica, que se celebrará en la India del 1º al 19 de octubre, lanzamos esta carta abierta para exigir a nuestros gobiernos que detengan la expansión de las plantaciones de árboles en nuestros territorios y que adopten en el Convenio una posición firme contra la financierización creciente de la naturaleza.
¡Lo que los pueblos indígenas llaman “lo sagrado” no puede tener un precio, y debe ser defendido!
Para firmar esta carta, sírvase enviar un mensaje a letter-21-09-2012@wrm.org.uy, especificando su nombre, organización y país.
También puede firmar a través de este formulario en línea

REDD Y LOS MERCADOS DE CARBONO Imágenes integradas 1



Se prevé que la Conferencia de Río+20 impulsará una mecánica que viene gestándose con la participación de gobiernos, empresas y varias organizaciones ambientalistas y que bajo el paraguas de las economías verdes se refuercen las iniciativas como REDD. La propuesta de REDD en términos generales pretende meter a la naturaleza dentro de un esquema de mercado, basado en la especulación en torno al carbono que fijan los bosques. En el caso de los manglares, la preocupación de que sean incorporados a REDD es mayor, debido a que el manglar es un ecosistema que fija hasta seis veces más carbono que otro tipo de bosques. Por ello rechazamos las pretensiones de integrarlos a este esquema que amenaza los territorios y los derechos colectivos de los pueblos ancestrales del ecosistema manglar. Alertamos sobre las posibilidades de que las comunidades sean engañadas, vendiéndoles la idea de la restauración de los ecosistemas de manglar en el marco de estrategias de REDD, REDD+. El sistema de compensaciones de carbono no es ético, permite y justifica que las empresas que producen gases de efecto invernadero (GEI) continúen generándolos sin hacer cambios en sus forma de producción. Las industrias y los países podrán seguir quemando petróleo y sus derivados, aumentar el volumen de los gases, continuar calentando el planeta, contribuyendo a la crisis climática, pero maquillando sus emisiones de verde y justificando su contaminación bajo el argumento de que éstas se están fijando en los manglares u otros bosques, a miles de kilómetros de donde se produce la contaminación. Nos pronunciamos en contra de las políticas que tergiversan la información y que basándose en la alta productividad de los manglares y su capacidad de fijación de carbono, pretenden incluirlos entre las negociaciones internacionales sobre el clima, una intención que ha sido divulgada por el Programa de Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente PNUMA a través de UN-REDD PROGRAME[1] y que considera a los manglares como una “opción viable de inversión.” En Río+20 debe de reconocerse el papel de los manglares y otros bosques y humedales en relación al cambio climático, como amortiguadores naturales del impacto de fenómenos extremos: tsunamis, tormentas, inundaciones entre otros, sin pretender que su protección implique solamente los mecanismos de compensación económica como los mercados de carbono. El carbono azul, es un concepto relativamente nuevo, pero que en esencia también promulga la valoración de los ecosistemas marinos y marino costeros desde una perspectiva del carbono. La Conferencia de Río+20 no debe ser considerada como una oportunidad para establecer una nueva agenda que permita validar las iniciativas que buscan aprovecharse económicamente de la problemática ambiental. En el contexto de Río + 20 expresamos nuestra preocupación y rechazo total ante una inclusión de los bosques de manglares en los programas de REDD y REDD+ dentro de la perversa propuesta de economías verdes. Este programa cada vez es más cuestionado por el irrespeto a los derechos de las poblaciones y por no representar una alternativa real ante el cambio climático.
https://mail-attachment.googleusercontent.com/attachment/u/0/?ui=2&ik=552ca8bc1f&view=att&th=1399dddce39f1651&attid=0.2&disp=inline&realattid=f_h6sgh7tk1&safe=1&zw&saduie=AG9B_P8F71W_0xtcXKf7l2DXugOc&sadet=1347546949593&sads=tWcILGQBxnZZwU5i0Fa9_SqUUX8

 https://mail-attachment.googleusercontent.com/attachment/u/0/?ui=2&ik=552ca8bc1f&view=att&th=1399dddce39f1651&attid=0.3&disp=inline&realattid=f_h6sghc2l2&safe=1&zw&saduie=AG9B_P8F71W_0xtcXKf7l2DXugOc&sadet=1347546952743&sads=pRuZtIQ4CT9v_hY0Tp8tBmupc9Y

Cuarto Poder

Indígenas dicen no a brecha

jueves, 08 de septiembre de 2011

Edgardo Ayala
06/09/2012
Elio Henríquez * CP. Las comunidades indígenas de la región "Amador Hernández", en la Reserva de Biosfera Montes Azules, en la Selva Lacandona, rechazaron nuevamente el paso de la Brecha Lacandona al lado de sus tierras "porque tiene como propósito disponer las mismas medidas del lado Lacandón en servicio de las potencias capitalistas".

El proyecto en la Reserva de Montes Azules es la nueva máscara, máscara climática, con la que "pretenden encubrir el despojo de la biodiversidad de los pueblos", añadieron en una declaración emitida el pasado 21 de agosto, al finalizar el Foro Regional en Contra de la Brecha Lacandona y el Despojo Capitalista de la Selva Lacandona, efectuado en el ejido "Amador Hernández" con la presencia de diversas comunidades de la región.

"Hablando del cambio del clima, para nosotros está claro que los responsables mayores son las empresas capitalistas que han pactado con los países ricos que sus emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero se mitiguen en los bosques de nuestros pueblos", agregaron.

Remarcaron: "Rechazamos todas las formas con las que el Gobierno Federal y dirigentes de organizaciones, en servicio de los capitalistas, quieren despojarnos de nuestras tierras y de nuestros recursos."

Los asistente al foro hicieron un llamado "a estar pendientes de la doble intención de esos programas: despojarnos pero también cambiar nuestra cultura para desorganizarnos y neutralizar nuestra resistencia".

Denunciaron que "el Gobierno Federal ejerce un control sobre el pueblo que por decreto (1972) llamó Lacandón, que ha venido utilizando para legitimar todos los planes de despojo de tierras y desalojos de nuestros pueblos".

Los habitantes de la zona rechazaron "los proyectos turísticos de los capitalistas o del Gobierno Federal como el que ha dividido al ejido 'Emiliano Zapata' en la laguna de Miramar".

Añadieron: "Rechazamos la política de acaparamiento de tierras impulsada por el Banco Mundial, las organizaciones conservacionistas y sus gobiernos neoliberales", y también "rechazamos la otra cara del despojo: los proyectos de minería, aprobados para regiones no importantes para la conservación y explotación trasnacional de la biodiversidad, como sucede en el municipio de Chicomuselo donde resisten los pueblos".

Las comunidades de la llamada Región Amador, exigieron "la regularización agraria de las comunidades Galilea, Benito Juárez Miramar y Chumcerro, ubicadas dentro de la Reserva de Biosfera Montes Azules".

Ante las pretensiones de las autoridades de continuar con el proyecto de la Brecha Lacandona, propusieron "reorganizarnos y ampliar a todos los niveles nuestras relaciones con otros pueblos y con organizaciones independientes que no sirvan al poder, para constituir una red de resistencia de los pueblos".

Asimismo, "elaborar planes internos en nuestras comunidades para fortalecer la producción de nuestros propios alimentos; fortalecernos en la palabra de Dios y en la memoria comunitaria de nuestros abuelos".
https://mail-attachment.googleusercontent.com/attachment/u/0/?ui=2&ik=552ca8bc1f&view=att&th=1399dddce39f1651&attid=0.4&disp=inline&realattid=f_h6sghgxo3&safe=1&zw&saduie=AG9B_P8F71W_0xtcXKf7l2DXugOc&sadet=1347546954717&sads=72r95pcD4ew7vyY9tWr1ZfVpANU

 

Ambientalistas e indígenas contra mercado de carbono








Banco Mundial impulsa programa que podría traer consecuencias ambientales y sociales negativas.
Ambientalistas e indígenas centroamericanos redoblan esfuerzos para evitar que gobiernos de la región participen en un programa impulsado por el Banco Mundial (BM) que busca incluir a esas naciones en el mercado de carbono, porque afirman que tendrá efectos negativos para el medio ambiente y para las personas.

Organizaciones sociales han enviado cartas al Fondo Cooperativo para el Carbono de los Bosques (FCPF, por sus siglas en inglés), la instancia del BM que coordina el mencionado programa, exigiendo que sean rechazadas las peticiones de ingreso hechas por gobiernos del istmo o que se aclaren una serie de deficiencias e irregularidades detectadas.

“Hacemos un llamado a los gobiernos de Centroamérica (…) y al FCPF del BM a que revisen y corrijan sus actuaciones”, reza la resolución del Encuentro Regional sobre Industrias Extractivas y Políticas Climáticas en Territorios Indígenas de Mesoamérica, celebrado el 17 de agosto en San Salvador, en el que participaron organizaciones indígenas de la región.



Varios gobiernos centroamericanos han iniciado ya el proceso para participar del Programa de Reducción de Emisiones por Deforestación y Degradación de Bosques (REDD, por sus siglas en inglés), coordinado por el FCPF. Una vez aprobados todos los requerimientos de ingreso, en manos del llamado Comité de Participantes, los países podrán ingresar al mercado de compraventa de carbono del FCPF, de US$215 millones.

El Salvador envió el 1 de junio al FCPF una nueva versión del documento con el que pretende ir cumpliendo con los requisitos para entrar a REDD en el proceso conocido como de preparación, que puede extenderse hasta finales de año. Los requisitos tienen que ver con el desarrollo de sistemas para monitorear, medir y verificar emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero (GEI), que causan el calentamiento global. También incluyen la puesta en marcha de salvaguardas sociales y ambientales, las cuales no se están ejecutando, según las organizaciones demandantes. Honduras, Nicaragua y Panamá también se encuentran en el mismo proceso.

REDD es un complejo mecanismo de desarrollo limpio (MDL) incluido en el Protocolo de Kioto sobre cambio climático, aprobado en 1997, cuyo objetivo es reducir las emisiones de GEI. Cada país que ha ratificado el Protocolo de Kioto tiene asignadas cuotas de emisión de GEI que no debe sobrepasar. Si un país o empresa ha sobrepasado esos límites y no cumple con sus cuotas de reducción de GEI, tiene la posibilidad de comprar créditos o bonos de carbono.

Un bono de carbono es el derecho a enviar a la atmósfera una tonelada de dióxido de carbono (CO2), uno de los seis GEI. Esto quiere decir, por ejemplo, que si una empresa que tiene un límite de emisión de 100,000 TM de CO2 anuales, supera esa meta y emite 10,000 TM más, debe adquirir bonos de carbono equivalentes a ese exceso. A su vez, los proyectos que dejan de emitir GEI pueden obtener Certificados de Reducción de Emisiones (CER); cada CER representa una TM que se deja de emitir a la atmósfera y puede ser vendido en los mercados de bonos de carbono. A este sistema se le conoce como MDL y REDD tiene que ver con temas forestales, ya que la quema o tumba de bosques generan GEI.

Estos bonos se negocian en dos tipos de mercado: el oficial, regulado por el Grupo Intergubernamental sobre Cambio Climático (IPCC), que establece las certificaciones, y el voluntario no regulado, en el cual ciertas empresas compran bonos de mercados futuros, como si fuera una bolsa de valores.

Críticas a REDD
El programa es duramente cuestionado por organizaciones civiles centroamericanas e internacionales, porque advierten que esa es una forma de que los países ricos soslayen su responsabilidad de reducir sus emisiones de GEI.

“En lugar de implementar políticas que lleven a una reducción de sus emisiones, las naciones industrializadas quieren seguir con sus mismos patrones de consumo”, dijo a Noticias Aliadas Yvette Aguilar, experta salvadoreña en cambio climático. “Y mejor pagan a los países pobres para que lo hagan por ellos”.

En junio pasado, la Coordinadora Nacional de los Pueblos Indígenas de Panamá se quejó en una carta dirigida a funcionarios de la Autoridad Nacional del Ambiente y a la representante de las Naciones Unidas en Panamá, Kim Bolduc, por no destinar los recursos financieros prometidos para desarrollar proyectos sociales en los territorios indígenas.

En principio esos fondos estarían disponibles como parte del esfuerzo gubernamental para incluir a los pueblos autóctonos en el programa REDD que el gobierno está impulsando con el auspicio de las Naciones Unidas, conocido como UN-REDD.

“Nos sentimos utilizados en este proceso”, dice la carta.

Poco antes, una veintena de organizaciones civiles salvadoreñas escribieron también al FCPF, rechazando el proceso de inclusión a REDD en el que se encuentra el gobierno, y demandando que esa petición sea vetada porque de aprobarse “habría graves implicaciones para la sociedad salvadoreña, aumentando su vulnerabilidad y la frecuencia de los desastres”.

Eso, en la medida en que el programa no ataca el problema de fondo, como es el que las naciones que más contaminan, las industrializadas, hagan un esfuerzo serio por bajar sus emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero, dicen los expertos consultados.

Por su parte, la Confederación de Pueblos Autóctonos de Honduras (CONPAH) denunció en febrero pasado que el gobierno de ese país está dispuesto a llevar a cabo el proceso para participar del programa REDD sin consultar a esas comunidades indígenas y afrohondureñas.

“Es una violación a nuestros derechos, ya que como pueblos desconocemos el contenido y el alcance del programa, y tampoco se ha obtenido el consentimiento libre e informado como lo mandan las directrices del FCPF”, señala la CONPAH en una carta dirigida al ministro de Recursos Naturales y Ambiente de ese país, Rigoberto Cuéllar.

La CONPAH exigió la suspensión de toda actividad relativa al REDD en los territorios indígenas y afrohondureños.


Reducción de emisiones
La experta salvadoreña Maritza Erazo dijo a Noticias Aliadas que esos programas REDD pueden implicar el desalojo de las comunidades que habitan en los bosques, pues se deben cumplir a cabalidad los contratos que obligan a mantener intactas las áreas boscosas, lo que implica que no se pueden realizar ningún tipo de actividades productivas.

“Cuando este mecanismo se aplique, eso puede afectar a las comunidades indígenas o campesinas que allí viven, porque puede cambiarles su forma de vida; ellas ya no podrían por ejemplo hacer uso de la madera, para viviendas o combustible, porque eso podría considerarse como degradación del bosque”, dijo Erazo.

Los expertos consultados concordaron en que, además de los efectos para las comunidades y las personas, es el planeta el que está en juego, si no se reducen las emisiones de GEI. Y el programa REDD permite que las naciones industrializadas, las que más contaminan, no las reduzcan.

En las conferencias internacionales sobre cambio climático de Cancún, México, celebrada en noviembre del 2010, y la de Durban, Sudáfrica, en noviembre del 2011, las naciones industrializadas se desligaron de la obligación de bajar sus emisiones, como lo había establecido el Protocolo de Kioto, y en su lugar han ofrecido negociar en el 2015 una reducción que recién entrará en vigor en el 2020.

Ángel Ibarra, presidente de la no gubernamental Unidad Ecológica Salvadoreña, dijo a Noticias Aliadas que, así como está impactando el cambio climático, se necesita que las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero bajen en un 50% hacia el 2020 para que el aumento de la temperatura del planeta no supere el 2°.

“De lo contrario, la temperatura subirá a 4°, con serias repercusiones para la vida”, acotó. 




México: REDD+ en Chiapas financia enfermedad, muerte y confrontación intercomunitaria


En México, la deforestación avanza a un ritmo acelerado, al compás de diversos megaproyectos: la rápida expansión de monocultivos industriales de palma aceitera y plantaciones de jatrofa para la producción de biocombustible; la construcción de represas; las concesiones mineras; la creación de centros de reasentamiento de complejos prefabricados en los sitios estratégicos de extracción de recursos y reconversión de la tierra; el turismo en gran escala; las carreteras, que viabilizan los proyectos.

El llamado “desarrollo” se interna no solamente en la selva sino en territorios indígenas autónomos y comunidades campesinas cuya resistencia a la expulsión, que definen como “cultural y física”, ha sido violentamente reprimida, dejando un saldo dramático de presos, heridos y muertos.

La expansión de los negocios aprovecha ahora el grave problema del cambio climático, una de cuyas causas – aunque no la primera – es la deforestación.

Los intereses que luchan a brazo partido para no cambiar un sistema económico que ha confluido en esta amenaza mundial, le han buscado la vuelta al problema y han creado – entre varios otros subterfugios – el mecanismo denominado REDD (reducción de emisiones por deforestación y degradación de bosques). Esta estrategia, que atribuye un valor financiero al carbono – expresado en “créditos de carbono” - contenido en los árboles, aduce ser un incentivo económico para que a los países en desarrollo les resulte más rentable proteger los bosques que cortarlos.

La otra cara de la moneda es que, por un lado, los países ricos que compran los créditos de carbono pueden seguir contaminando, y por otro lado, las comunidades que dependen de los bosques son expulsadas y se les niega el acceso a lo que hasta ahora consideraban sus tierras.
El gobierno mexicano está alineado a la concepción mercantil de los bosques, considerados como meros reservorios de carbono, y ha abrazado con entusiasmo la estrategia REDD. Como documenta Gustavo Castro Soto (1), el Estado de Chiapas “se lanza a la delantera en la carrera por el negocio del Cambio Climático, poniendo a sus bosques, selvas y plantaciones de monocultivos al servicio del mercado de carbono. Nuevamente, el subsidio del estado a las empresas se plasma en el negocio de la crisis climática con la participación de ONGs conservacionistas empresariales, trasnacionales, al servicio del lucro ambiental. … Así, desde 2009, el Gobierno de Chiapas inició la construcción del Programa de Acción ante el Cambio Climático en Chiapas (PACCCH) financiado por la Embajada Británica, y Conservación Internacional (CI) como actor clave en su conducción”.

El informe da cuenta de que los proyectos piloto que tiene Conservación Internacional para 2011 en Chiapas – donde existen un millón 300 mil hectáreas consideradas reservas naturales, de las cuales casi el 50 por ciento están en la selva Lacandona – entran dentro del esquema del acuerdo firmado en noviembre de 2010 entre los gobernadores de California, Arnold Schwarzenegger; de Chiapas, Juan Sabines Guerrero; y de Acre, Brasil, Arnobio Marques de Almeida Junior, en el contexto de la Tercera Cumbre Global de Gobernadores ante el Cambio Climático llevada a cabo en California, Estados Unidos. Ese acuerdo establece las bases para iniciar un mercado de compraventa de bonos de carbono, integrando REDD y otras actividades de carbono forestal a los marcos regulatorios de Estados Unidos y otras partes.

Esto implica que las autoridades de Chiapas deben generar las condiciones para la compra de bonos de carbono.

De ahí el convenio que en diciembre de 2010 suscribió el gobernador de Chiapas con las comunidades de la Selva Lacandona, que, como anuncia el referido informe, serán usadas por el gobierno “para confrontarse con otras organizaciones y comunidades indígenas y campesinas al promover su expulsión incluso con violencia”. En tal sentido, el gobernador de Chiapas arengó a los comuneros con estas palabras: “ustedes se van a comprometer a cuidar las reservas, que nadie se meta, a cuidar que nadie quite los árboles, a cuidar que nadie se meta a cazar, la van a cuidar para todo el planeta, para todo Chiapas, para todo México, para toda la humanidad la van a cuidar.” Sin embargo, inmediatamente fuera de la zona destinada para la venta de carbono, el gobierno aseguró que continuará la expansión de las agroindustrias, de los centros turísticos, de las plantaciones industriales de palma aceitera, entre otros emprendimientos.

El proyecto REDD tiene como escenario una región donde las comunidades campesinas, como describe Jeff Conant en un exhaustivo informe del recorrido que realizó recientemente por la zona (2), han convivido con la selva abriendo espacios productivos para plantar maíz y frijoles, pero resistiendo los emprendimientos destructivos de la agroindustria: ganadería, tala ilegal de maderas preciosas, explotación petrolera.

La respuesta de las autoridades ha sido la aplicación de programas arbitrarios de “protección forestal”. Crearon reservas excluyentes, como la Biosfera Montes Azules, y expropiaron diversas áreas aledañas. No obstante, el movimiento campesino en defensa de su territorio, recursos y cultura indígena iniciado por las comunidades de Amador Hernández, zona núcleo de la Reserva de Montes Azules, y decenas más en las zonas vecinas, logró detener en 2008 la ejecución de la expropiación.

Pero las presiones han sido fuertes. Los inversionistas del proyecto REDD+ impulsado por el gobierno estatal y federal para presentarlo en Cancún en la COP16, exigían la certeza jurídica sobre el territorio. Frente a ello, según denuncia el COMPITSCCH (Consejo de Organizaciones de Médicos y Parteras Indígenas Tradicionales por la Salud Comunitaria en Chiapas) (3), en abril de 2010, sin mediar aviso ni explicación, el gobierno retiró el personal médico y suspendió el suministro de medicamentos y los traslados aéreos para los casos urgentes en la región Amador Hernández, seguramente con el objetivo de castigar y doblegar a una región con historia de resistencia. Esta medida, en un contexto de histórica medicalización indiscriminada y falta de acciones de promoción y educación para la salud, provocó un disparo en la morbilidad. Y fue por este resquicio de dependencia – la salud regional medicalizada – donde se intentó doblegar, por muerte y enfermedad, a los rebeldes, los niños y ancianos primero.

Según informa el COMPITSCCH, “Los infantes, carentes de vacunas, han enfermado por cientos y decenas de ellos han tenido que ser trasladados de emergencia a centros hospitalarios, como el hospital San Carlos en el municipio vecino de Altamirano. Las fiebres no ceden y mantienen elevados picos febriles durante semanas; varios presentan cuadros de asfixia y azulamiento en los dedos de las manos, y otros más cursan una persistente tos seca típica de la tosferina. Los hay también que se convulsionan por dificultades respiratorias, produciéndose a veces desmayos, pero en estos casos, al parecer, la causa estaría en un mar de parásitos que colman las vías altas”.

A principios de este mes, la asamblea comunitaria de Amador Hernández envió una carta abierta (4) a autoridades del gobierno federal reclamando que restablezcan el servicio de salud y exigiendo al gobierno de Chiapas, entre otras cosas, “Que suspenda el proyecto REDD+ estatal en la Comunidad Zona Lacandona por constituir un plan de contrainsurgencia que promueve el enfrentamiento con las comunidades vecinas” y “Que deje de estar engañando a los pueblos indígenas sobre el objetivo climático del proyecto REDD+ en Chiapas y declare su verdadero propósito: conservar y recuperar la biodiversidad de las áreas más ricas para entregarlas al control y explotación trasnacionales”.

Esta carta fue apoyada y circulada como alerta de acción internacional por varias organizaciones sociales de distintos países del mundo, quienes invitan a firmarla y enviar nombre, afiliación institucional (si tiene), país, y dirección de correo electrónico a: contact@globaljusticeecology.org

La asamblea de la comunidad Amador Hernández de Chiapas tiene claro lo que significa el proyecto REDD+:“Para los pueblos indígenas que libre y valientemente han decidido caminar su destino en camino distinto al del régimen político y sistema económico que todo vuelve mercancía y despojo, el mal gobierno manda enfermedad y muerte lentas, y proyectos que potencien su confrontación intercomunitaria, hoy pagada con los recursos de REDD+. Y todo esto instrumentado en nombre y servicio de la humanidad.”

Artículo elaborado en base a la información obtenida de:

(1) “EnREDDar a Chiapas”, El Escaramujo, Gustavo Castro Soto, Otros Mundos AC/Amigos de la Tierra México, http://www.otrosmundoschiapas.org/index.php/component/content/article/118-el-escaramujo/897-el-escaramujo-enreddar-a-chiapas.html
(2) A Broken Bridge to the Jungle: The California-Chiapas Climate Agreement Opens Old Wounds”, by Jeff Conant, Communications Director at Global Justice Ecology Project, correo electrónico: jefeconant@gmail.com, http://climate-connections.org/2011/04/07/a-broken-bridge-to-the-jungle-the-california-chiapas-climate-agreement-opens-old-wounds/ ,
(3) “La salud como instrumento de represión y exterminio: El caso de la región Amador Hernández, Reserva de la Biosfera de Montes Azules‏”, pronunciamiento del Consejo de Organizaciones de Médicos y Parteras Indígenas Tradicionales por la Salud Comunitaria en Chiapas (COMPITSCCH), http://wrm.org.uy/paises/Mexico/COMPITSCCH.pdf
(4) “Alerta de acción: Retiro de Servicios de Salud en Amador Hernández, Chiapas, en avance del REDD +”; http://www.globaljusticeecology.org/connections.php?ID=544


Pueblos Indigenas hacen un llamado por una Moratoria sobre REDD+ 

Pueblos Indígenas hacen un llamado por una Moratoria sobre REDD+





La Alianza de Pueblos Indígenas y Comunidades Locales contra REDD y por la Vida, hace un llamado para una moratoria sobre Reducción de Emisiones por Deforestación y Degradación Forestal (REDD+) en la 17 Conferencia de las Partes de la Convención Marco sobre Cambio Climático (CMNUCC), hasta que las siguientes preocupaciones estén plenamente abordadas y resueltas. Sin embargo, nos reservamos el derecho de expandir estas demandas.

Nuestro llamado por una moratoria se fundamenta en el principio de precaución que plantea que, “cuando una actividad amenaza con perjudicar la salud humana o el medio ambiente, las medidas de precaución deberían tomarse aún si algunas relaciones de causa y efecto no se establezcan científicamente.” La moratoria que estamos exigiendo es la precaución que debe tomarse para asegurar nuestros derechos y medio ambiente porque la mayoría de los bosques del mundo se encuentran en las tierras y territorios de los pueblos indígenas.


REDD+ amenaza la supervivencia de los Pueblos Indígenas y comunidades que dependen de los bosques y podría resultar en el despojo de tierra más grande de todo el tiempo. Basado en investigaciones profundas un número creciente de informes recientes proporciona evidencia que los pueblos indígenas están siendo sometidos a violaciones de sus derechos como resultado de la implementación de políticas y programas tipo REDD+, incluyendo: el derecho a la vida de los opositores a REDD, desplazamiento forzoso y reubicación involuntaria, la pérdida de tierras, territorios y recursos, medios de sustento, soberanía y seguridad alimentaria, y la imposición del llamado “sustento alternativo” que resulta en la separación de nuestra gente de sus comunidades, culturas y conocimiento tradicional. De igual forma, nuestros derechos al consentimiento, libre, previo e informado, libre determinación y autonomía, consagrados en la Declaración de las Naciones Unidas sobre los Derechos de los Pueblos Indígenas (DNUPI), están también violados. Cabe señalar que las mismas Naciones Unidas reconocen que REDD+ podría resultar en la clausura de los bosques. Además REDD+ se presenta como un medio para fortalecer los derechos a la tenencia de la tierra, pero de hecho se utiliza para debilitarlos.

Denunciamos que las salvaguardas contenidas en Los Acuerdos de Cancún no conforman un marco que no previene ni detiene la violación de nuestros derechos individuales y colectivos establecidos bajo la DNIPI y otros instrumentos internacionales; dado que no establecen obligaciones jurídicamente vinculantes, ni mecanismos para garantizar nuestros derechos, presentar quejas o exigir la reparación de daños. Los esfuerzos que hemos realizado para fortalecer las salvaguardas sobre derechos humanos en la COP17 han sido rechazados por los grupos de contacto pertinentes de SBSTA y LCA dentro del proceso de la Convención.

REDD+ y el Mecanismo de Desarrollo Limpio (MDL) promueven la privatización y comodificación de los bosques, los árboles y el aire a través del comercio y compensación de carbono de los bosques, suelos, agricultura, y podría incluir hasta los océanos. Esto podría comodificar casi toda la superficie de la Madre Tierra, lastimar nuestra relación con lo sagrado y violar los derechos de la Madre Tierra. Denunciamos que los mercados de carbono son una hipocresía que no detendrán el calentamiento global.

También manifestamos nuestra profunda preocupación en torno a que las fuentes de financiamiento para la compensación de carbono para REDD+ provengan del sector privado y de los mercados de carbono en los cuales están implicadas las industrias extractivas. Los mercados de carbono y REDD+ convierten nuestros territorios y bosques en una suerte de basureros de carbono, mientras los mayores responsables de la crisis climática no asumen compromisos vinculantes de reducciones de emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero (GEI) y continuaran generando ganancias. El mismo Banco Mundial ha informado “que la composición de los flujos financieros requeridos para la estabilización y adaptación climática, serán, a largo plazo, principalmente del sector privado.”

REDD+ no solamente perjudica a los pueblos indígenas y comunidades locales sino también al medio ambiente. REDD+ promueve las plantaciones industriales y puede incluir la siembra de árboles transgénicos. Los incentivos perversos ya están aumentando la deforestación y la substitución de bosques nativos con monocultivos.

REDD+ pone en peligro el futuro de la humanidad y el equilibrio de la Madre Tierra porque fomenta el uso de combustibles fósiles, que es la causa principal de la crisis climática. De acuerdo con el Director de la NASA, James Hansen, el climátólogo más distinguido del mundo, “Los países industrializados podrían compensar de 24-69% de sus emisiones a través del MDL y REDD… así evitando las reducciones nacionales necesarias que se requieren para que las emisiones lleguen a su auge a partir de 2015.”

Los proyectos tipo REDD causan conflicto dentro y entre comunidades indígenas, y otras poblaciones vulnerables. La pérdida del uso tradicional de los bosques, los incentivos financieros, el convertir los bosques en mercancía, la especulación financiera y el despojo de tierras socavan nuestros sistemas tradicionales de gobernanza, generan conflictos .

Además, cada vez que una comunidad firma un contrato sobre REDD+ en un país en vías de desarrollo, que proporciona créditos para contaminar a la industria de combustibles fósiles y otros responsables del cambio climático, permite la destrucción ambiental y lastima a comunidades vulnerables, en otros lugares, incluyendo en el norte. Por favorecer la explotación y quema continua de los combustibles fósiles, REDD+ permite continuar con la contaminación en países industrializados, amenazando así a las comunidades en el Norte que ya están sobrecargadas con esos impactos. No es posible reformar o reglamentar REDD+ para prevenir esta situación.

Debido a los problemas en la determinación de la línea de base, fugas, permanencia, monitoreo, reporte y verificación que los formuladores de políticas y metodologías no están dispuestos y no pueden solucionar, REDD+ está socavando el régimen climático, violando también el principio de responsabilidades comunes pero diferenciadas establecido bajo la Convención. Los créditos para contaminar, generados por REDD+ obstaculizan la única solución viable al cambio climático: mantener el petróleo, carbón y el gas natural en el subsuelo. Tal como los créditos de carbono producidos bajo el MDL del Protocolo de Kioto, REDD+ no tiene la intención de lograr reducciones verdaderas de emisiones, si no simplemente “compensar” por el uso excesivo de combustibles fósiles en otros lugares.

Además, el carbón biótico –el carbón almacenado en bosques—nunca puede ser el equivalente climático al carbono fosilizado del subsuelo. El dióxido de carbono resultado de la quema de combustibles fósiles se añade a la sobrecarga general del carbono perpetuamente circulando entre la atmósfera, vegetación, suelos y océanos. Esta inequivalencia, entre muchas otras complejidades, hace que la rendición de cuentas de carbono de REDD+ sea imposible, así, permitiendo que los comerciantes de carbono inflen el valor de los créditos de carbono de REDD con impunidad.

Con sustento en lo antes establecido, hacemos un llamado urgente al Consejo de Derechos Humanos de las Naciones Unidas, la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas sobre Derechos Humanos, el Relator Especial sobre Pueblos Indígenas, el Foro Permanente de las Naciones Unidas para las Cuestiones Indígenas y las organizaciones de derechos humanos a que investiguen y documenten las violaciones provenientes de los políticas y proyectos tipo-REDD+, asimismo que preparen los informes, emitan recomendaciones, y establezcan medidas cautelares y reparaciones para garantizar la implementación de UNDRIP, y otros instrumentos y normas relacionadas.

En resumen, las políticas y proyectos tipo REDD+ están avanzando muy rápidamente, permitiendo que preocupaciones cruciales sobre derechos humanos y medio ambiente sean descartados. Reafirmamos la necesidad de una moratoria sobre REDD+. En conclusión, enfatizamos que los bosques están conservados y manejados exitosamente con la gobernanza indígena sobre las tierras y territorios colectivos de los Pueblos Indígenas.


Boletín N° 180 del Movimiento Mundial por los Bosques: "Rio+20: el poder corporativo sin límites"


Que nadie se deje engañar por las muchas caras ‘verdes’ que las empresas nos muestran para ocultar sus violaciones, sus verdaderas prácticas. ¡Continuemos uniéndonos y fortaleciéndonos en la lucha contra el poder corporativo y a favor de la vida!
MOVIMIENTO MUNDIAL POR LOS BOSQUES TROPICALES
Boletín Mensual - Número 180 - Julio de 2012
NUESTRA OPINIÓN


Rio+20: el poder corporativo sin límites
MÁS ALLÁ DE RIO+20
Continuar con nuestras luchas
Diferentes procesos celebrados paralelamente durante Río + 20 muestran los intereses opuestos de corporaciones y gobiernos, por un lado, y de movimientos sociales, organizaciones y redes activistas, por otro lado. La Cumbre de los Pueblos representó un avance al analizar, proponer y construir colectivamente, una agenda común para más allá de Río +20.
COMUNIDADES Y BOSQUES


Asesinatos en el mundo entero – el precio del acaparamiento de tierras
Un nuevo informe de Global Witness revela la violencia creciente, las violaciones de derechos humanos y los asesinatos que suscita el incremento de la competencia por tierras y bosques
Camboya: primer seguro de riesgo político para un proyecto REDD
Por primera vez en la historia, un proyecto REDD ha obtenido una póliza de seguro contra riesgos políticos. Dicho seguro, cubierto por la agencia financiera para el desarrollo OPIC, dependiente del gobierno de Estados Unidos, protegería 64.318 hectáreas de bosque. Pero, en realidad, el seguro protege a los inversores extranjeros contra la posibilidad de que Camboya reglamente los proyectos REDD.
El Salvador: repudio a la preparación para REDD+
El gobierno de El Salvador presentó un documento por el que muestra que está “preparado para participar en los sistemas de incentivos financieros para REDD+ (R-PP). Organizaciones sociales y de académicos de El Salvador expusieron públicamente los argumentos para su repudio al R-PP.
Malasia: la represa de Baram inundaría aldeas indígenas para provecho de la minería en Borneo
Varias aldeas y comunidades tradicionales quedarían inundadas, y el ecosistema fluvial se vería afectado, si se construyera en Borneo la represa de Baram, para beneficio del gigante minero australiano Rio Tinto.
Nigeria: un proyecto de plantación de cacao amenaza los bosques intactos de los Etara y los Ekuri-eyeyeng
La reserva de bosque habitada por las comunidades Etara y Ekuri-eyeyeng puede desaparecer, debido a la plantación industrial de cacao de la Southgate Cocoa Produce Limited, vinculada a la compañía británica Armajaro Trading Ltd.
COMUNIDADES Y MONOCULTIVOS DE ÁRBOLES


Filipinas: la compañía A. Brown se apodera de las tierras del pueblo indígena Higaonon para plantar palma aceitera
Una Misión de Inspección Internacional (MII) descubrió que la compañía A. Brown Inc. comenzó a plantar palma aceitera en la tierra de los Higaonon, en el sur de Filipinas, sin haber obtenido autorización para operar. La MII pidió una investigación sobre violaciones de los derechos humanos de los Higaonon, que incluirían el asesinato y el arresto ilegal de agricultores, incendio de casas, destrucción de plantíos, acoso y amenazas de muerte.
Gabón: resistencia al acaparamiento de tierras de Olam para plantar palma aceitera
Alerta social contra la concesión de grandes extensiones de tierras ancestrales a una empresa para establecer plantaciones de palma aceitera.
Chile: campaña contra la expansión forestal
Acción contra una nueva ofensiva de las empresas forestales que buscan duplicar los más de 3 millones de hectáreas plantadas con monocultivos de eucaliptos y pinos, tratando de anexar las tierras de campesinos chilenos y comunidades Mapuche.
PUEBLOS EN MOVIMIENTO
• Campaña mundial para desmantelar el poder corporativo
• Mirando al futuro: reforma agraria y defensa de la tierra y el territorio
• Campaña contra FELDA, gigante del aceite de palma
• La compañía minera Rio Tinto gana la medalla de oro del “maquillaje verde” 2012
RECOMENDADOS
• “El lado oscuro de los acuerdos de inversión”
• “Madera caída del bosque tropical: una opción ambientalmente sana y socialmente justa para producir madera”
Para acceder al boletín en formato WORD, haga clic en el enlace a continuación y descargue el archivo:

La Petrolera Shell financia REDD PDF Imprimir
Escrito por Administrator   
Miércoles, 08 de Septiembre de 2010 10:47
BOLETÍN DE PRENSA
Contacto: Nnimmo Bassey, Director Ejecutivo, Environmental Rights Action/Amigos de la Tierra Nigeria (+234)8037274395
Tom Goldtooth, Director Ejecutivo, Indigenous Environmental Network (Red Indígena sobre el Medio Ambiente)(218)760-0442

La Petrolera Shell financia REDD

Pueblos Indígenas y ambientalistas denuncian

La empresa petrolera Shell, mundialmente censurada por haber causado genocidio contra el Pueblo Ogoni y destrucción ambiental en la Cuenca Níger de Nigeria, ahora está financiando REDD, una falsa solución al cambio climático que mete los bosques en el mercado de carbono y que ha sido denunciado como posiblemente “la usurpación de tierras más grande de todos los tiempos.”

REDD (Reducción de Emisiones por Deforestación y Degradación) permite a los contaminadores como Shell, la minera Rio Tinto y la petrolera Chevron-Texaco comprar créditos de carbono provenientes de la supuesta conservación de los bosques y así evitar la reducción de sus emisiones del efecto invernadero en el lugar donde se originan. Sin embargo, según la Red Indígena sobre el Medio Ambiente, REDD está cargada de “incentivos perversos” para convertir los bosques naturales en plantaciones de monocultivos y en realidad REDD aumenta la deforestación y la tala.

Shell, la empresa de gas natural Gasprom y la Fundación Clinton están financiando el proyecto tipo-REDD Rimba Raya sobre 100,000 ha en la provincia de Kalimantan Central en Indonesia. Según Reuters, el proyecto Rimba Raya marca "un hito" en el desarrollo de un mercado mundial de créditos de carbono forestal.

Este proyecto REDD de Shell podría sacar muchísimas ganancias. Reuters calcula que “A una tasa de 10 dólares por cada crédito de carbono, se podría ganar hasta $750 millones en 30 años.”

Reconocido ambientalista nigeriano, Nnimmo Bassey, Director de Environmental Rights Action y Presidente de Amigos de la Tierra Internacional, tiene una larga historia luchando contra las actividades destructivas de la extracción petrolera. “Shell nos ha traído puro sufrimiento, la destrucción de comunidades y biodiversidad, así como los derrames petroleros y la quema ilegal de gas desde hace décadas. Ahora podemos añadir el financiamiento de REDD para lavar su imagen y sacar ganancias a la larga lista de las atrocidades de Shell.”

Tom Goldtooth, Director Ejecutivo de la Red Indígena sobre el Medio Ambiente, señaló que “Shell ya cometió genocidio contra el Pueblo Ogoni en la Cuenca Níger. REDD permite que Shell y otras empresas multinacionales expandan la extracción de combustibles fósiles y sigan destruyendo el clima y violando los derechos de los Pueblos Indígenas del mundo.  Actualmente, Shell está intentando perforar en las costas de Alaska a pesar de las protestas de los indígenas de Alaska.”

“Shell no solamente está perjudicando a la Madre Tierra y los Pueblos Indígenas sino ahora está financiando  REDD que puede resultar en la usurpación de tierras más grande de todos los tiempos y más genocidio contra los Pueblos Indígenas,” avisó Goldtooth.

Según Goldtooth, “La mayoría de los bosques del mundo se encuentran en las tierras de los Pueblos Indígenas. Los proyectos tipo-REDD ya han resultado en despojos de tierra, violaciones de derechos humanos, amenazas a la supervivencias cultural, militarización, estafas y servidumbre.”                                                           

Para Teguh Surya, Director de Campanas de WAHLI–Amigos de la Tierra Indonesia, REDD es simplemente “un eco-negocio descarado y patético” “Shell no debe utilizar nuestras selvas hermosas para el lavado verde de los crímenes contra el medio ambiente y los abusos de los derechos humanos que Shell ha cometido en Nigeria y otros lados.”

La semana pasada, Vía Campesina, una organización internacional de 300 millones de campesinos, rechazó REDD y denunció que la conservación forestal no se debe agarrar como “excusa” para que “países y corporaciones sigan contaminando…” Vía Campesina también subrayó que “el comercio de carbono ha probado ser extremadamente lucrativo en términos de generación de ganancias para los inversionistas, sin embargo ha fallado rotundamente en la reducción de gases de efecto invernadero.”

CITA: David Fogarty y Sunanda Creagh. Indonesia project boosts global forest CO2 market. Reuters. 24/8/10.

No hay comentarios:

Publicar un comentario en la entrada